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Chicago Code Camp Call for Speakers is Open

by Angela 17. February 2016 08:52

In case you haven’t heard, Chicago Code Camp call for speakers opened last week and we need you! Not heard of Chicago Code Camp? Well, grab a cup of coffee and pull up a chair because we have a great story! This is our 8th year, and once again we’ll be staying in downtown Chicago at the Illinois Institute of Technology to make sure we are centrally located and easy to get to by car, train, or subway. It is a day to learn from the community. It is a day to contribute to the community. Please join us by sponsoring, attending, speaking, or all three! We cannot be successful without you. 

The mission of Chicago Code Camp is to provide a credible resource within the IT industry. Our goal is to offer a wide range of opportunities to learn about advancements in our field, to share knowledge from our experiences, and to develop valued relationships with our peers. To that end, Chicago Code Camp is a FREE, day-long event. We are here to connect the talent and expertise within the Developer community of the Windy City, and that includes YOU. Discussions for the day have previously included development and trending topics in .net, java, open sourced frameworks, web, mobile, cloud, robotics, testing, soft skills, and more.

So what ideas, technologies, or strategies do you want to share with us? Everyone has something to contribute, whether its information on a new JavaScript framework, teaching us how to leverage Docker to strengthen our DevOps practices, sharing experiences adopting scrum, or how to handle ourselves better in job interviews. We are looking for a broad set of experiences across just about any topic related to being a technology professional.

Note on our selection process: In order to be fair towards all the speakers who submit for sessions for the Code Camp, the speakers are chosen via a blind voting process by the Chicago Code Camp Advisory Council (CCCAC). The advisory council is made up of various local and regional user group leaders and industry experts. The council will only see the topic title, abstract, and level of difficulty of the talk when voting for the abstract. The council does not have access to the presenter's information. The abstracts with highest votes are then placed into tracks and presenters are notified.

So take a few minutes to absorb some caffeine, think about some topics you’d be willing to share with the rest of the tech community in Chicago, then submit your ideas here: http://www.chicagocodecamp.com/Submissions/WantToShare

 

Hope to see you at Chicago Code Camp this April!  Oh, and general registration is not open yet, but stay tuned for news on that Smile

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Time’s Running To Register for ThatConference and Book Your Room

by Angela 14. July 2015 15:15

Early bird discount pricing ended earlier this month, but even at the $499 rate it’s an amazing deal! We have an incredible line-up of speakers and more sessions than your brain can shake a very big stick at! I’m particularly jazzed about uncle Bob’s talk on the future of software. And don’t forget about the 3 FREE events leading up to the conference:

  • GiveCamp and The Humanitarian Toolbox - 8/8 - 8/9
  • Kids' Coding Dojo - 8/9/15
  • That CodeRetreat - 8/9/15

Haven’t bought your ticket? Or maybe got your ticket but not you’re room? What are you waiting for?

Due to awesome demand, the Kalahari room block has filled, but don’t worry, there is another option. Great Wolf Lodge, right across the street (and walkable, I’ve done it) from the Kalahari Resort, has created a block of discount rooms ($159 a night) just for our campers that they're holding open until July 19. To make a reservation, call 1-800-559-9653, or make reservations online at the website: www.greatwolf.com. Be sure to mention our room block to get the discount: "1508THAT".  Complimentary shuttle service will be available on a limited schedule during the conference to help you get back and forth.

Rooms are selling out fast, so get in on our discounted room rates while they are still available! And be sure to use my referral link when grabbing your ticket! Sunday is my birthday, so your ticket can earn me $5 to pay for a cocktail that night Smile

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/that-conference-2015-tickets-17016560992?discount=OakParkGirl_referral

Once you get your tickets, kick back, relax, and start favoriting the sessions you want to see while you’re in the Dells next month!

Tags:

personal growth | technology | development | conference | career

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Chicago ALM Meetup Deep Dives on Team Foundation Server 2015 and TFS Git with Ed Thomson in July

by Angela 7. July 2015 08:22

We are continuing our SUMMER OF VS 2015 with a special visit from the TFS product team this month! Yeah, I know right? It’s good to know people Smile 

So what are we talking about in July? Visual Studio 2015 and Team Foundation Server 2015 have arrived and with them come many new version control features and enhancements to existing features.  Code search, branch and gated build policies, branch history, CodeLens, and much much more.  We’ll take a lap through some of what’s new in 2015 plus talk about what to look forward to in some of the 2015 Updates.

Don't forget, VS 2015 and all the awesomeness that goes with it (TFS, MTM, RM...) release for general availability on July 20th! TFS 2015 will come soon after, for more details on why see Brian Harry’s blog post. But the good news is that all of the 2015 IDEs will work just fine with TFS 2013.

Hope you can join us to dig in deep on TFS version control.

 

Join Us Thursday, July 16, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Location:Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Agenda:6:30pm dinner 7:00pm Presentation

You *must* register to attend due to Aon Center security policies: http://chicagoalmug.org/

And please don't overpay for parking. SpotHero has some great parking very near to the Aon Center for as little as $10, I use them and I love the service!

Speaker Bio:

Edward Thomson is a Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft, where he develops version control integration for Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server.  Edward is a core contributor to the libgit2 and LibGit2Sharp projects, which are the open source Git libraries used by Microsoft tools (and many others).  Edward is a contributing author to Professional Team Foundation Server 2013 blogs about version control at http://www.edwardthomson.com/ and tweets at @ethomson.

 

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Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS | TFS 2015 | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio Online | Visual Studio | Visual Studio 2015 | development | SCM | Source control management

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It’s THAT Time Again! ThatConference Call for Speakers is Open for Just 2 Weeks

by Angela 31. March 2015 08:30

I can’t believe it is going to be our 4th year. Seriously. Craziness.

I still remember that fateful day almost 6 years ago. I was driving out to Detroit for a conference and I get a call from my buddy Clark. He’s telling me about this crazy idea to create a conference for everyone. It would have family stuff, include all kinds of technology, and it would be in a freaking water park in Wisconsin! What was not to love? And most importantly, did I want to help?? I had over a year at that point before the the kickoff of the inaugural ThatConference. It seemed like a lifetime away, and yet here we are. Every year I flop down on my bed after the last session and think GOD THAT WAS A LOT OF WORK, and then volunteer for next year because I can’t imagine NOT being involved in something this great. On to my point before I start getting all misty eyed. WHAT?

Call for speakers has just opened for ThatConference 2015. We’re going to be bigger, awesomer, geekier, and yes awesomer is a word because I said so! Smile We need great speakers. We need you. We need your KIDS to submit. I know, who knew? Last year we had an astounding number of geeklets presenting, leading open spaces, and coming up with some amazing ideas for this coming year. I am personally so stoked to see what the kids have ins store for US this year. No technology is off the table. No talk related to anything that anyone in the tech community would be interested in is off the table. Personally I plan to submit talks around not just TFS, and agile, but around fear and how many of us battle imposter syndrome. So be creative.

Next, please, check out our conference site, check out speakers and sessions from previous years, and then submit something that moves you. Here is a preview of our speaker submission “rules of the road”:

 

Tips for making your abstract epic:

  • Counselors have roughly 60 minutes to teach their fellow campers.
  • Descriptive and edgy titles are best. Bonus points for Summer Camp Geek references.
  • Make sure your abstract description contains enough detail so we know what you're going to talk about. Don’t worry if you make any mistakes we will have the opportunity to fix it later.
  • Try not to pull any switch-a-roos last minute and talk about something completely unrelated. Campers don't like that. If something changes, please work with That Conference.
  • We can't make too many promises but if there are issues with the final speaker schedule we will do our very best to accommodate you.

Do:

  • Be passionate about your chosen topic.
  • Feel free to submit more than one abstract. We have to maintain a balance across all of the tracks and their topics. It will just help us and potentially you.
  • Consider how your presentation is relevant to all technologists, but don’t feel constrained to avoiding a talk on one specific programming language, platform or technology.
  • Consider what discussions could be sparked by your presentation. That Conference is all about meeting people and discussing ideas; consider what people will talk about after your presentation.
  • Explain what benefit your presentation will bring to the audience.
  • Tell a story.
  • Show real world examples, especially your own experiences, to support your ideas. Show code samples or demonstrate product capabilities only where appropriate.
  • Make sure you can keep the documented session time limit.
  • Stay near the stage or podium after your presentation, encourage the audience to come up and discuss the presentation with you.
  • Please invite the audience to discuss your talk with you face to face rather than just at the end. Better yet, continue the conversation in our Open Spaces.
  • Respect our anti-harassment policy.

Don’t:

  • Use your presentation to specifically promote the superiority of one platform, language or technology over all others. Instead talk about pros and cons of the demonstrated subject, and invite the audience to share their own experiences related to your discussion.
  • See your presentation as a platform to market your company or product.
  • Include unnecessary animation or sound effects in your presentation that will distract from your content.

 

So seriously, don’t wait! Submit your talk, or talks, TODAY and don’t miss the opportunity to be a part of something truly awesome: https://www.thatconference.com/

Tags:

Agile | ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | personal growth | technology | development | Windows Phone | Visual Studio | ThatConference | Team Foundation Server | Scrum | SQL Server | Mobile development | Cloud Computing

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January 2015 ALM User Group with Uncle Bob

by Angela 2. January 2015 15:32

We ended 2014 on a high note by having none other than Doc Norton with us to talk about agile metrics. It was a fantastic thought and I’m sure many of you walked away with some great ideas of how to improve the way your team works together.

Well, we are also starting off 2015 with another great speaker, Uncle Bob! You may be familiar with his work on SOLID principals, or perhaps the Agile Manifesto, of which he was one of the original signers. I know right?!  So come chat with Uncle Bob about being a professional in today’s world of IT. I can imagine that this talk will be no less inspiring than last month’s talk. Here are the details for the Chicago ALM user group this month:

When: Wednesday, January 14, 2015 from 5:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Where: Microsoft-Downers Grove 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove

What: The time has come for software developers to define our profession, and to define ourselves as professionals. We must choose the disciplines, attitudes, and practices that comprise our profession, and then we must choose to live within those bounds. We must decide what standards we will keep, and we must pledge to say "No" when asked to breech those standards. In this talk Robert (Uncle Bob) Martin reviews this history that has led us to this culmination, and suggests a suite of disciplines, attitudes, and practices that follow from that history and may well become a definition of our profession.

Who: Robert "Uncle Bob" Martin is a software consultant and author. Martin has been a software professional since 1970 and an international software consultant since 1990. In 2001, he initiated the meeting of the group that created agile software development from extreme programming techniques. He is also a leading member of the software craftsmanship movement. He founded Object Mentor Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in training their clients in C++, Java, OOP, patterns, UML, agile methodologies, and extreme programming. From 1996 to 1999 he was the editor-in-chief of the C++ Report.

In 2002 he wrote Agile Software Development: Principles, Patterns, and Practices, which gives pragmatic advice on object-oriented design and development in an agile team. He has also published a number of popular books and articles on programming and software methodologies.

You can also keep up with Uncle Bob on his blog, and on Twitter.

Agenda:5:30pm dinner 6:00pm Presentation

 

As usual, please be sure to register to ensure that you are on the security list!

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Agile | development | personal growth | Process Methodology

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Chicago ALM User Group - Christmas 2014 Edition with Doc Norton

by Angela 5. December 2014 16:44

Join us on Wednesday, December 17, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM for this very special event!

December is always a special meeting for us!  We will have great food, lots of great giveaways, and I'm excited to say that we have an amazing speaker flying in from California for this event - Doc Norton.  You may already follow him on Twitter, read his blog, or maybe you have seen him speaking at one of many conferences.  If not, I highly recommend checking out his blog, and then be sure to sign up for our December event so you can hear him in person.

In December, Doc will be tackling effective metrics.Velocity is one of the most common metrics used-and one of the most commonly misused-on agile projects. Velocity is simply a measurement of speed in a given direction-the rate at which a team is delivering toward a product release. As with a vehicle en route to a particular destination, increasing the speed may appear to ensure a timely arrival. However, that assumption is dangerous because it ignores the risks with higher speeds. And while it’s easy to increase a vehicle’s speed, where exactly is the accelerator on a software team? Michael “Doc" Norton walks us through the Hawthorne Effect and Goodhart’s Law to explain why setting goals for velocity can actually hurt a project's chances. Take a look at what can negatively impact velocity, ways to stabilize fluctuating velocity, and methods to improve velocity without the risks. Leave with a toolkit of additional metrics that, coupled with velocity, give a better view of the project's overall health.

Speaker Bio: Doc is Global Director of Engineering Culture at Groupon. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. An agile practitioner and coach since 1999, Doc's 20-plus years of software development experience have provided him with exposure to a wide range of topics. Doc declares expertise in no single language or methodology and is immediately suspicious of anyone who declares such expertise. A frequent speaker, Doc is passionate about helping others become better developers, working with teams to improve delivery, and building great organizations.

Location:Microsoft-Chicago 200 East Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Register here: http://chicagoalmug.org/

As always, please be sure to register soon so I can order the right amount of food and so that the security folks will let you in! You can park in the Aon center for a discounted rate after 6pm, but your best bet may be SpotHero if you choose to drive. I’ve seen $8 parking ½ block away using their service.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Agile | development | SDLC | Culture | Metrics

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It’s almost Fall, and that means more Conferences

by Angela 6. October 2014 09:39

So conference season is kicking in full force again, and I already have quite a few on my radar, though sadly I doubt I can attend them all.  Here are a few worth taking note of, and some are coming up FAST so be sure to register if you’re at all interested because you may lose out!

 

DevOps Days Chicago (10/7 and 10/8): I am particularly bummed that I cannot make it to this one.  Not just because it is organized by my friend Matt Stratton of Arrested DevOps, but because it’s guaranteed to be chock full of topics relevant to ANYONE in the software biz.

DevOpsDays is a community-driven technical conference that focuses on bridging the gap between development and operations. The first DevOpsDays took place in Ghent five years ago, and there have been over forty events worldwide since then. Now, it is finally coming to Chicago.  DevOpsDays provides a collaborative environment where people can interact with their peers, learn about tools and automation, and discuss best practices. The topics covered are relevant for developers, system administrators, infosec engineers, QA engineers, product managers, technical managers, and anyone else responsible for delivering software.

This 2 day event is only $149. You can even receive a 10% discount on registration by using the promo code DEVOPSMATT when registering: http://devopsdays.org/events/2014-chicago/registration/

Also, seriously listen to Arrested DevOps, it’s a great podcast.

 

St Louis Day of .NET (11/13 through 11/15): Just a 5 hour drive (or Amtrak ride) away is this fantastic conference.  I attended, ran a booth, and spoke at this event last year.  There are over 140 sessions with a full day of “pre-compiler” sessions where you can get your hands dirty for a very small additional cost. It’s currently still in early bird pricing, so just $200 for the conference, and $84 for a full had precompiler session. If you register after October 13th the price jumps to $300, and it’s $600 at the door.  So register quick!

They have top quality speakers, a great conference space, a full roster of local tech sponsors (like Polaris Solutions of course!) fun events to network (and just have fun), and is a really good value given how little it costs to attend.  Also, the hotel is pretty swank too, so bring the family if you want to just spend the weekend there :)

 

Agile Day Chicago 2014 – (October 9th) This as a new one (to me anyway) and seems really promising.  For just $99 I get an entire day of learning, collaborating, and sharing ideas with other agile practitioners in the Chicagoland area. The theme this year: Product Driven Learning - Listening, Learning, and Doing. 

  • Learning - Learn patterns and ideas that are currently being done for product learning
  • Listening - New ideas for product learning
  • Doing - An all interactive track where you will be doing things hands on

Sessions will speak to various topics like product design, leadership, technology and development practices all with a focus on outcomes.

More information can be found here - http://devjam.com/2014/07/31/agile-day-chicago-2014/

 

I’m also super stoked to be attending the Microsoft MVP Summit again! But this one is just for Microsoft MVPs. Hope to see you there if you;re an MVP!  And if you’re not an MVP yet, chat with me some time about the benefits, and what kinds of activities qualify you for MVP, it’s an amazing program to be a part of :)

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Something a little Different for the Chicago ALM User Group in October

by Angela 17. September 2014 15:54

So you may have noticed that the Chicago ALM User Group has been a little quiet this summer. Summer is always a tad slow and everyone would rather be out enjoying some time with the family, or maybe by heading up to the Wisconsin Dells for ThatConference like I did :)  Well, summer break is over and the Chicago ALM user group is back! We’ll be meeting in early October for something a little different.

I recently started working with a local firm who has come a long way in their quest for agility and a healthy corporate culture. They've accomplished some amazing positive changes in their use of ALM tooling, in their software delivery process, and most importantly in their corporate culture. Join us in October to hear their story, and maybe pick up some tips on how to make similar changes within your own teams.

Story-telling and panel discussion: Ever wonder how agile is supposed to work in real life, like how it’s described in the books? We did too and tried it out. We want tell our story, “There and Back Again”, a development team’s tale of how we are becoming agile including the thrills of victory and agonies of defeat, then open it up for a panel discussion.

Speaker Bios:

Daniel Porrey has 24 years’ experience in the IT industry with a range of skills from networking and hardware to software development. He has worked for several international based organizations striving to achieve high efficiency while driving the greatest levels of business value. Having been "classically" trained in IT as an Engineer, he has successfully completed numerous large scale projects under the waterfall methodology. With the need to gain even higher performance from his teams, the desire to hire and retain high performance talent, and the ability to deliver more automation, he converted his group to agile over the past several years with great success. In all endeavors, his primary focus has been on the quality of the delivered product.

Anthony Perkins has been part of developing software almost two decades. He has experienced being developer, software architect, and now manages a .Net application team. After working in the waterfall environment most of his career, Anthony is in the midst of transitioning to agile methodologies. Driving for continuous improvement, he looks for ways to improve the delivery of high quality software and overall development process.

Raja Tirumala Rao Guna  has over 9 years of software development experience in Microsoft.Net technologies.   He worked in different roles starting as developer and moving up the path as Dev lead, Tech Lead and Architect, though always a developer at heart.  For the past 2 years he been working on agile projects and using TFS to help on board his teams with Agile engineering practices.

Chris Steele has more than 14 years of professional software experience, and has been working with agile for over 9 years, with a heavy focus on Scrum. Working independently, with consulting agencies, or internally, in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia has provided him with a wide range of experiences and a keen insight into the common problems and solutions that companies find when embracing agile, as well as how to present and sell it to clients ranging from the smallest to global enterprises. Having worked as a development team member, a ScrumMaster, a Product Owner, a resource manager, and an agile coach, in a variety of settings, Chris has had the opportunity to directly experience the day-to-day pulls and stresses inherent in each role, and in almost every organization type imaginable. Passionate about organizational change, and the benefits of agility, Chris also has experience as a speaker both locally and internationally.

 

Register now to secure a seat! http://chicagoalmug.org/

Tags:

Agile | ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Collaboration | Microsoft | Process Methodology | Productivity | SDLC | Scrum | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2013 | TFS | Visual Studio 2013 | VS 2013 | development

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Central Region Developer Days Across the Central US – Coming Soon to a City Near You in May 2014

by Angela 28. April 2014 10:06

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Join us for these free, fun, no-fluff events for developers, by developers.

You'll learn from experts in a low-key, interactive way and get the knowledge you need to take your skills to the next level. Get up close and personal with the technologies you need to build innovative new applications and enjoy lots of time to talk shop with your peers. Check out the different events currently being offered near you and register today!
Seating is limited for the FREE EVENT so register today.

 
Events run from 8:30am - 5:00pm.

 
 

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Refactor Your Dev Skills at Dev Days 2014
Microsoft's Refactor Your Dev Skills at Dev Days 2014 is a conference where Microsoft shares the latest Operating System, cloud, device, development and developer tools. Much of the material is inspired from the 2014 Build Conference, with exciting announcements expected in all of the categories above. If you didn't have time to view as many build sessions as you would have liked, and didn't have time to pull together the key developments, this is the conference for you. These events are meant to distill an overview of the latest developments on Microsoft platforms and highlight some of the best new capabilities for developers.
5/9 - Chicago, IL | REGISTER NOW >>
5/14 - Southfield, MI | REGISTER NOW >>
5/16 - Austin, TX | REGISTER NOW >>
5/16 - Columbus, OH | REGISTER NOW >>
5/9 - Dallas, TX | REGISTER NOW >>
5/23 - Edina, MN | REGISTER NOW >>
5/23 - St. Louis, MO | REGISTER NOW >>

 
 

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Enterprise Developer Bootcamp
Do you have existing .NET client line of business (LOB) applications? Join Microsoft developer experts, and see how to modernize these applications and move them forward. Learn what the Microsoft devices and services strategy is and how existing applications fit in. See demos, and work through hands-on labs to learn how and why to move your LOB applications to Windows Azure, how to use third-party controls to add a modern look and feel, and how to provide your users the ability to use LOB apps on a variety of devices, including Windows 8 and Windows Phone. And do all of this using Visual Studio 2013 and your existing XAML skills!
4/23 - Columbus, OH | REGISTER NOW >>
4/29 - Downers Grove, IL | REGISTER NOW >>
5/5 - Austin, TX | REGISTER NOW >>
5/6 - Dallas, TX | REGISTER NOW >>
5/6 - St. Louis, MO | REGISTER NOW >>
5/6 - Southfield, MI | REGISTER NOW >>
5/14 - Edina, MN | REGISTER NOW >>

 

Tags:

WinRT | Windows 8 | Azure | Cloud Computing | Windows Phone | .NET | VS 2013 | Visual Studio 2013 | Visual Studio | Mobile | Mobile development | Microsoft | development | XAML

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ALM Ruminations Part 2: TPS Reports and Writing Myself a New Pair of Fluevogs

by Angela 3. September 2013 17:58

Yes, Fluevogs. What? I don’t need a minivan!  My husband will find it amusing that I managed to get a plug in there for my favorite boots from the Fluevog fall lineup. It’s OK, I’ll stop talking about shoes now, read on...

If you’ve been following along with my ruminations about the process struggles and pop psychology required to survive software development, you may have already seen my first post. This is a follow-up, and I hope to have MANY more assuming I can find time between TFS installs Winking smile  So without further delay:

Favorite “Drive” quote #2: Goals that people [teams] set for themselves and that are devoted to attaining mastery are usually healthy. But goals imposed by others – sales targets, quarterly returns, standardized test scores, and so on – can sometimes have dangerous side effects.

So why do some managers cling to measuring their people by metrics like Lines of Code, # bugs fixed, and other archaic and easily gamed statistics? I can’t say for sure but I have some theories. One that I keep finding is that it’s often what they KNOW how to measure, and it makes them to feel like they have control over things. But sadly the accuracy of those metrics if often unreliable, at best. Add to that, their direct reports may have figured out how to work the system to meet artificially established goals, hiding issues, and masking discontent. Or perhaps software development management folks haven’t yet figured out what behavioral scientists have known for years - that creative work is actually HARMED by the use of extrinsic rewards systems.

Solving the first issue (bad metrics) is tough, how do you make someone see there is little value in many of the metrics that have traditionally been used since the beginning of IT? What SHOULD they be measuring instead? What are they themselves being measured on, and are those metrics effecting how they reward/punish the software team? I’m still working on perfecting how to address this one myself, and I often immediately point to the Dilbert where the software developer “codes himself a new minivan” as a wake-up call. Often times, it does not even occur to them that their cherished status reports might be at the root of the team’s problems.

The second point (hiding issues) is one I see even more often, where software teams themselves train managers that no matter how unreasonable a deadline, no matter how many times they change requirements, that the tem will double-down, work a lot of overtime and get it done. Even worse, most times the overtime goes unreported, and so any normal manager may conclude that any “small request” can be accommodated at the drop of a hat, and so will continue to do so. The team may be seen as a hero, but can also be seen as one that does not plan well, and is often scrambling to meet deadlines.  It is a double-edged sword. The team inevitably burns itself out trying to keep up, quality suffers in favor of getting features out the door quickly, and the manager often doesn’t get everything they wanted anyway. And no one is happy, not you, not the manager, and certainly not the customer. It’s lose-lose-lose situation and it doesn’t HAVE to be that way.

On the last point (squelching creativity), this is possibly the toughest of all to address, because again, most of us “IT folk” are not psychologists. Maybe your boss does not have an IT background, and simply does not understand that writing software is actually quite complex and difficult. You may have crafted hundreds of web pages, but that doesn’t mean that the 101st web page isn’t a totally different animal. God forbid the framework or tooling upon which you rely to build web pages has gone through a major upgrade recently!  I blame this on the inappropriate and overused comparison of software development to building a house. NO, NO, NO it is NOT just like building a house. And if you think the metaphor holds I doubt if you’ve ever actually written any software, or at least you haven’t in the last 10 years or so. Or maybe you want your software to turn out like just another plastic shoebox in a huge soulless fields of cheap Mc Mansions. Sure, in some cases the issue here is that IT management do not personally feel the pains or understand the challenges that the team is going through, or maybe they, in fact, are causing the pain… After all, the first step to recovery is realizing you have a problem in the first place…Seriously, we need an “agile intervention” offering complete with a 12-step program!

So if this sounds like where you work, buy your boss a copy of Drive and an anthology of Dilbert cartoons, and please stop training them to continue to give you unreasonable goals by working overtime and underreporting issues and bugs to make things look rosy. I promise you, that strategy may payoff in the short term, but in the long term nobody wins!

OK, I have a lot more spinning through my head but I think we’ve done enough navel gazing for this post. Stay tuned for more musings in the next week or so.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | General | Process Methodology | SDLC | Scrum | development

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