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Application Quality Enablement with TFS 2012 and MTM 2012 at SDC Tomorrow

by Angela 14. November 2012 05:00

Not sure if you’ve been to any of the sessions held by the Software Development Community in Chicago but they are always good. This month I get the opportunity to speak there myself and wanted to let folks know.  If you cannot make it to my session tomorrow, I will be presenting the information again at the Visual Studio launch event in Chicago (“The New Era of Work”) later this month as well.  Be sure to sign up for notifications of future SDC meetups, it’s a great group! 

In the meantime, here is the info for my session tomorrow:

When: Thursday, November 15, 2012 -- 5:45

Where:  i.c.s -- 415 N Dearborn, Chicago, IL (map) -- 3rd Floor, Sign will be posted at the door.

Session: Application Quality Enablement with TFS 2012 and MTM 2012 - With the rise of modern apps and the modern data center, we require a modern lifecycle approach that supports the need to increase velocity, deliver continuous value and manage change while enabling quality. See a unique and full lifecycle perspective on quality enablement with rich demos infused along the way to illustrate our the software testing/QA story. Demos will include:
• Product Backlog
• Storyboarding
• Exploratory testing
• Client Feedback

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Multi-Tenant TFS Data Tiers? Yes You Can!

by Angela 6. November 2012 08:27

Multi-what TFS? In other words, hosting multiple instances of Team Foundation Server data tiers and all of their associated databases on the same data tier.

So we ran into quite the conundrum here, wherein we had just one physical server available to act as a TFS Data Tier, but needed to host at least 2 TFS 2010 instances on it to try some stuff out in relation to a coming upgrade. I needed to upgrade a number of our project collections to TFS 2012, while leaving some number still on TFS 2010 until we could do further validation on some customizations. It seemed risky, maybe even impossible, but mostly because I had never tried.  I certainly never saw that as an option in the installation docs or on MSDN.  It wasn’t until I sat down with a DBA who looked at it purely from a database perspective that I thought to just give it a try and see what happened. Obviously this is a development environment and NOT their production TFS Smile  You certainly COULD do this in production but it would make me nervous when it came to things like DR, so I’m not going to even entertain that notion.  But, in my situation, I already had a dual tier TFS 2010 environment setup in DEV, and I had a second AT server to use as a test bed for the upgrade to TFS 2012, but my main issue was how I could take collections from a single TFS instance, and upgrade only half of them to 2012 while the others were still available on 2010. I wondered, “can I upgrade the new app tier to 2012 while leaving the other app tier, hitting the same data tier, on TFS 2010?” The answer is, “sure you can!” 

we_can_do_it

Now if you look at TFS merely from the front end perspective this might seem odd, or risky, but like I said, I had a DBA who knew nothing about TFS but knew databases really well helping me to noodle through it.  I knew just enough about SQL Server to be dangerous, so together we made quite the team when it came to “let’s just try it and see what happens, it’s only DEV after all!”.  What I came to understand, and maybe I should have realized this sooner, is that when you upgrade TFS, or do any operations on it from the App Tier, it only affects the databases that are referenced by its configuration database.  So, 3 separate App Tiers have 3 separate Configuration databases, and 3 separate sets of databases (Collections, warehouse, etc.) that can coexist on a single data tier. So upgrading an AT from TFS 2010 to TFS 2012 only updates the schemas of the databases specified in the Configuration database associated to that AT.  Main requirement here is that it is a version of SQL that can support both products, so SQL 2008 R2 + current Service Packs.

So here is what I am running today:

image

Looking back, knowing what I now know, it makes sense too. Now, once again, I spent many many hours researching this on-line and could not find any documentation to confirm or deny that this was even possible. It took a few emails to some folks in North Carolina, you know – the dudes who WROTE the software – to confirm that yes indeed, you can host multiple instances of TFS on a single Data Tier. Turns out, they do it too! So I was pretty stoked to discover that I could in fact host 2 different TFS instances on a single Data Tier machine AND that it was a supported (although completely undocumented) scenario.

Rad huh? When you dig into the SQL Server instance it can become a confusing mess of config databases, and collection databases to manage, but it can also be a useful thing to know for upgrade and testing scenarios where you simply cannot get additional hardware for the DT.  Now yes, this absolutely can make things tricky for the DBA too if you are not using the TFS Backup and Restore Tools for backing up data. I certainly recommend using the built in TFS Backup tools if it is an option. But that is a discussion for another day… and another blog post.

I will happily accept dark chocolate in tribute Smile

Tags:

ALM | Agile | SDLC | Power Tools | TFS 2010 | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | Team Foundation Server

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So I ran into this issue today while creating a TFS 2010 Backup Plan

by Angela 31. October 2012 13:30

So as you would expect, I as a consultant do not have god-like access to things in production like I do in the dev and test environments.  So occasionally I get tripped up on access rights, and when it comes to TFS, well, they could do a much better job of listing out all the places where you do and do not need Admin rights, sysadmin rights, farm admin rights… Well, it’s all out there between the Ranger Guidance, best practices documents, install docs and MSDN documentation but you have to do a LOT of cross referencing to get it all.  And sure, ideally anyone who is a TFS admin would be able to just ask nice and smile and get all those rights, but this is the real world and many large companies are PARANOID about handing out access like that to production.  I had to fight to get the minimal rights documented in the TFS guidance, let alone anything extra.

While upgrading TFS 2010 to 2012 at this current client, I am stopped dead in my tracks at least a few times a week, sometimes a few times a day, by “Access Denied”. My most recent one was extra tricky because it involved a Power Tool and as you know, those are often not documented very well. So, on to my story…  I was setting up a Backup Plan on TFS 2010 using the nifty Power Tools feature (see screen below) from the Admin console.  I login to the TFS application tier with my account, a TFS Admin user.  I know that my account has sysadmin rights on SQL because I am a TFS Admin, and when it comes time to providing the account to run the backup plan under I provided the TFSService account which I know has Administrator and sysadmin rights on the data tier server:

image

So between those two accounts I would think everything was OK. I don’t know for sure, but if the Backup Plan is running as the TFSService account the way it is setup here, well that account is king of the world so everything should “just work”. And yet:

clip_image002

So to hopefully make this something that comes up when someone else does a search on this message, here is what I saw - “Error    [ Backup Plan Verifications ] The current username failed to retrieve MSSQL Server service account. Please make sure you have permissions to retrieve this information.” 

WTH?! And when I opened up the error log the first error I encountered was:

TFS upgrade xp_regread() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.' xp_regread() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.' 

Again, WTH?!

So the DBA goes off and starts researching what xp_regread() does, and tried to figure out why this isn’t an issue in our dev and test environments given that everything was setup the same, and I start digging through forums.  Finally I find one sad and lonely little post on the MSDN forums related to the issue that recommends 1) logging in as a TFS Admin user (OK, I’m with you) and 2) “ensure that the user who perform this Backup Plan have required permission in SQL Server”.  Wait, what?  Be more specific please. What *ARE* the required permissions??  This happens all the time. Don’t tell me to “make sure you have appropriate permissions” without clarifying what those are. Otherwise, well, duh! I *think* I have the right permissions but clearly I am mistaken.

I dig through the Ranger Guidance which as far as I can tell is the only place this tool is documented.  It doesn’t say the person CREATING the backup plan has to be an admin on SQL, and it IMPLIES the account specified to run the job has to be an ADMINISTRATOR but only because the example specified a  Administrator account. Here, right from the guidance:

image

But even that doesn’t necessarily imply a SQL admin, and nowhere in the doc does it say what rights either account (logged in user or “Account”) should have. I just went back and read it AGAIN, does not say anything IRT rights of either of those users in the Guidance. I suppose if you knew what it was doing behind the scenes you could infer the rights needed from the MSDN docs (I found this later). I made an educated guess that because in dev and test I am a server Administrator on the DT, and the Backup worked just fine there, that me being a SQL Server Admin must be a requirement.  So I logged back into my production TFS AT with another account that I knew was admin on every server in the TFS implementation (I know, I know), and the backup plan was created just fine. .

Our DBA does NOT like making TFS admin accounts SQL Administrators, but if I can show him explicit rules that say YOU CANNOT DO YOUR JOB AS A TFS ADMIN WITHOUT IT, he will do it.  So please Microsoft, don’t make it so darn difficult to divine what rights all of the accounts need for the various tasks the user will do. Particularly the Power Tools which make people nervous anyway.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | MSDN | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS 2010 | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Rangers

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Default Roles and Permissions for TFS 2012 in and Handy Dandy Spreadsheet

by Angela 23. October 2012 11:47

So we’ve already had one situation where we had to use a recover command and lost all of our permissions, roles, etc. Restoring them can be a HUGE PITA because while Microsoft was kind enough to document them, you need to cross reference two different pages to see both the default permissions themselves, and the default assignments of those permissions to TFS groups and roles. BUT you cannot easily visualize them in the format you would see them in when setting your permissions.  IOW, you are setting values in a dialog like this:

image

But the documentation is provided in this format:

image

NOT HELPFUL right? I had to search the pages by role or group, highlight where they showed up, and :: scroll, scroll, scroll:: to find all of the places where they existed to set the values. The documentation is NOT in line with the implementation. I kept thinking “if only this was in Excel, I could sort, and filter and SEARCH. There would be unicorns and rainbows!!” I searched, no one seemed to have posted a permissions matrix on-line and my buddies on the product team claimed no knowledge of one. They did say if I created one they would love to have it. And after the help they’ve given me lately, how could I say no?  Smile

I am more than a bit OCD and just sucked it up and spent the time building this in a spreadsheet format that was sortable and filterable.  It is EXPLICIT permissions only, so those listed in the two referenced source pages. So I spent about 2 hours building this, but in the long run it will save me FAR more than 2 hours. JUST LOOK!

image

You can access the spreadsheet here, and all sorting and filtering work: https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=E796C9484DF4BAA3!10019&authkey=!AJ0OZWvOhG8OjHs  Note that I separated it into 2 worksheets, Server, Collection and project level in one, and everything else in the other.  I was going to put it all into one, but there were WAY too many columns and it was hard to read. 

 

Again I say, you’re welcome! Please let me know if you notice anything I might have missed, I am human after all.  Since it is SkyDrive updates will be posted in real time as I fill in any gaps or make corrections. If you feel compelled to repay my kindness I love dark chocolate and gerber daisies. Consequently if you meet up with me at a user group or tech event and want to thank me, I also prefer Hendricks gin Winking smile

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | MSDN | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio 2012

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So You Were Forced to Use the dreaded TFS Collection /Recover Command, Now What?

by Angela 11. October 2012 08:23

Since we have used Recover on a production database and lived to tell the tale I thought I would share our experiences. If you read this post you will know that one of my client’s got themselves into a world of hurt where we needed to restore a nightly backup that was not detached.  I know, I know, detached backups are the way to go.  Well, now THEY know that too Winking smile  Nonetheless, sometimes you may find yourself needing to recover a TFS Team Project Collection (TPC) database, and if you’ve read the MSDN documentation you’ll know this is not an ideal situation. The Recover command is very lossy, BUT you get your data back. And in our case it was worth the risk.

So here is the backstory…  Someone deleted a Test Plan with a month’s worth of data in it, and if you know MTM you know there is no “undelete”. Restoring a backup was our only hope. BUT our nightly backups are SQL backups of the entire SQL Server instance, so undetached (we are addressing this NOW). Plucking one TPC out of there and attaching it is just not an option. And we did not have hardware to restore the entire thing and detach it properly.  So here is what we did:

  1. Restore the backed up TPC from the nightly backup into our dev TFS environment
  2. Used the TFSConfig /Recover command, followed by TFSConfig /Attach to get it attached in dev
  3. Used the TFSConfig /Recover command to get the TPC into the proper state
  4. Detach the hosed TPC from production
  5. Restore that detached version of the TPC to production
  6. Attach the backup to production (we actually hit an interesting bug in TFS 2010 at this point, so the attach was quite harrowing and involved an emergency hotfix to our TFS sprocs, I may blog about later.)

Now, I would love to say everything was perfect but the recover command did blow away some things that we had to get back into place before people could use the TPC again.  What we lost:

  1. All the security setting ever!
    • Collection level groups and permissions
    • Team Project (TP) level groups and permissions in every TP in the TPC
    • Permissions around Areas and Iterations in every TP in the TPC
    • Permissions around Source Control in every TP in the TPC
  2. SharePoint settings  (in every TP in the TPC). Settings on the SharePoint server themselves will be fine of course but you will probably see a “TF262600: This SharePoint site was created using a site definition…” error when you try to open the portal site that was once attached to those TPs. You will need to fix this in 2 places.
    • Go to TFS Admin Console, select the TPC you just restored and make sure the SharePoint Site settings for the TPC are correct. It will probably be set to “not configured” now.
    • Open team explorer (as an Admin user), and for each TP go to “Team Project Settings | Portal Settings” and verify everything there is correct. Ours were just plain gone so we had to enable the team project portal and reconfigure the URL.
  3. SSRS Settings – this will probably be fine if you restored the database as-is but we also renamed it as part of the restore, and so had to update the Default Folder Location through the Admin Console for the TPC in order for this to work again.

So word to the wise, make sure you understand what the settings above are for all of the TPs in your TPC BEFORE you perform a Recover command because chances are you will have to manually set them all back up.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | MSDN | MTM | Microsoft Test Manager | Microsoft Test Professional | TFS | TFS 2010 | Team Foundation Server | VS 2010 | Visual Studio | TFS Administration

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So you accidentally deleted your MTM Test Plan, Now What?

by Angela 10. October 2012 04:14

So this week, we had a little bit of fun, by which I mean a day that started with panic and scrambling when someone accidentally deleted a Test Plan (yes, a whole test plan) in MTM in production. A well established test plan with dozens of test suites and over a hundred test cases with a month’s worth of result data no less... Some important things of note:

  • test plans are not work items, they are just a “shell” and so are a bit easier to delete than they should be (in my opinion)
  • there is no super secret command-line only undelete like there is for some artifacts in TFS, so recreate from scratch or TPC recovery are your only options here to get it back
  • when you delete a test plan, you lose every test suite you had created.  Thankfully, not test cases themselves, those are safe in this situation.  Worst case, a plan can be created, although it is tedious and can be time consuming.
  • when you delete a test plan, test results associated with that test plan will be deleted*. Let that sink in – ALL OF THE TEST RESULTS FOR THAT TEST PLAN, EVER, WILL ALSO BE DELETED.  ::this is why there were flailing arms and sweaty brows when it happened::

So at this point, you may be thinking it’s time to update your resume and change your phone number, but hold up. You may have some options to recover that data, so buy some donuts for your TFS admin(I like cinnamon sugar, BTW).  I should mention, there may be a lot of other options but these are the three I was weighing, and due to some things beyond my control we had to go with #2.

1) Best Case Scenario: restore your DETACHED (this is required) team project collection database from a backup, cause you’re totally taking nightly backups and using the TFS Power Tool right? You lose a little data depending on how old that backup is, but it may be more important to get back your test runs than have to redo a few hours of work.

2) Second Best Case Scenario: If you cannot lose other data, and are willing to sacrifice some test run data, then restore the TFS instance from a traditional SQL backup to a separate TFS instance (so, NOT your production instance), open up your test plan in that secondary environment, and recreate your test plan in production.  Not ideal, but if you didn’t have a ton of test runs this may be faster and you don’t sacrifice anything in SCM or WIT that was changed since the backup was taken.

3) Worst Case Scenario: if your backups were not detached when you did your last backup, cry a little, then use the recover command to re-attach them. The gist is to use the TFSConfig Recover command on the collection to make it “attachable” again, then attach it to your collection. I have written a separate post on this because it can be complicated…

Once you are back up and running, make sure rights to managing test plans is locked down!  It might not be obvious that you can even do this, or where to find it, since it is an “Areas and Iterations” level permission. But do it, do it now!  This permission controls the ability to create and delete Test Plans, so be aware of that. But for the most part, anyone with authority and knowledge to delete entire Test Plans, considering what they contain, should be the only person creating them.  If everyone needs the ability to create/delete these willy-nilly, then you are doing it wrong, in my opinion anyway.

I am still in the midst of getting this back up and running so will update once we’re finished. There is an MSDN forum post out there regarding one bug I seem to have uncovered, if anyone wants to look at it and maybe fix my world by answering it Smile I am sure I’ll be able to add some more tips and tricks by then.

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Visual Studio 2012 Launch Event Coming to Chicago in September!

by Angela 29. August 2012 04:50

You might have heard that the official launch of Visual Studio 2012 is coming soon! Alas we cannot all afford to hop on a plane and head out to Washington State to party with the product team. BUT, lucky for you, there are also going to be local launches held at major cities across the U.S. You might not have noticed because all the marketing jazz has been heavily focusing on the Windows Azure part of that event, but there is going to be some great content around the development tools as well. Now you know!

Join Polaris Solutions at this free launch in Oak Brook, IL (about 20 miles west of Chicago) event to check out some of Microsoft’s newest leading-edge tools, including Microsoft Visual Studio 2012, Windows Azure, Windows Server 2012, and Microsoft System Center 2012. You'll get the opportunity to engage with the experts (like me), get hands on with the new technology, and learn how to build modern applications both on-premises or in the cloud using the Microsoft platform.

A special Visual Studio 2012 launch track was recently added to the CHICAGO event with a keynote from Brian Harry himself. I know, cool right?! Smile In his talk, you will learn about how Visual Studio 2012 can help you evolve your development practices to maintain relevancy, adapt to change and deliver on the needs of the business, rise to the challenge of the “New Normal”, and elevate your skills to keep pace with the fast changing world of application development and delivery. Be sure to stop by after the keynote and visit us at the Polaris Solutions booth as well!

At the event, you will also be able to participate in a raffle for a chance to win an Xbox 360 + Kinect Bundle.  Get registered soon before it sells out:  https://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032521310&Culture=en-US&community=0

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Microsoft Test Manager | Microsoft Test Professional | SDLC | TFS 2012 | TFS | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio | Visual Studio 2012

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August Chicago ALM User Group - Announcing Git Integration with TFS

by Angela 16. August 2012 10:43

I know, Microsoft supporting non-.NET developers and non-Windows folks? Inconceivable! ::gasp:: 

OK, so if you’ve been paying attention for the past couple of years, you might already know that this has been happening slowly. But recently there have been some seriously MAJOR developments. First, Microsoft made Entity Framework open source, and now they have added MVC, ASP.NET and more to that list. Dogs and cats, living together, mass hysteria…and all that.  Then when you thought it couldn’t get crazier, they announced TFS integration with Git!  My head just exploded a little, how about yours?

Come to the Chicago Microsoft office on August 29th and meet one of the TFS product team members, you heard it, ONE OF THE DUDES WHO WRITES CODE FOR TFS ITSELF! Edward Thomson will be discussing how to take advantage of the new git-tf tool to synchronize a local git repository with Team Foundation Server.  This cross platform bridging tool is especially useful for cross-platform developers, such as iOS developers on Xcode.

Edward Thomson is a Software Development Engineer at Microsoft, where he works on cross-platform version control tools for Team Foundation Server.  Before joining Microsoft, Edward worked on numerous source code control tools for Microsoft and Unix platforms.

Register now to make sure you get a spot. Building security also requires it, and it helps me not order gobs of food no one will show up to eat.  So help a girl out huh?

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | MSDN | SDLC | TFS | Team Foundation Server | VS 11 Beta | Visual Studio | Open Source | git | TFS 2012

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An interesting Quest (pun intended)…into Agile testing!

by Angela 9. May 2012 08:57

So there is a fantastic little conference gaining steam in the Midwest called Quest, which is all about Quality Engineered Software.  If you’ve never heard of it, you should seriously check it out next year regardless of your role.  As I have always said, Quality is NOT the sole responsibility of the testers, and this conference has something for everyone.  I was fortunate enough to be introduced to the local QAI chair who runs the conference the first year it ran (2008), which lucky for me also happened to be in my back yard.  I was with Microsoft at the time, and we had opted in as the biggest conference sponsor, cause let’s be real - who on earth in QA ever thought “Yeah, Microsoft has some awesome testing tools”.  ::crickets::  Right.

At the time VSTS (remember THAT brand? Smile with tongue out) was still new-ish, and the testing tools were focused almost entirely on automated testing. Yeah, I know, TECHNICALLY there was that one manual test type but let’s not even go there.  I know a few, like literally 3, customers used the .MHT files to manage manual tests in TFS, but it wasn’t enough. The automated tools were pretty awesome, but what we found was that MOST customers were NOT doing a lot of automation yet. Most everyone was still primarily doing manual testing, and with Word and Excel, maybe SharePoint. We had a great time at Quest talking to testers and learning about what they REALLY need to be happy and productive, we got the word out on VSTS and TFS, and started planning for the next year.  I was able to be part of Quest as a Microsoftie in early 2009 as well, when the 2010 tools (and a REAL manual test tool) were just starting to take shape, and then the conference spent a couple of years in other cities.  Fast-forward to 2012 when Quest returned once again to Chicago.

I was no longer a Microsoftie, but if you’ve ever met me you know that working a booth and talking to as many people as possible about something I am passionate about is something I rock at, and enjoy! So I attended Quest 2012 again this year, this time as a guest of Microsoft.  I worked the Microsoft booth doing demos and answering questions about both the 2010 tools and the next generation of tools, and WOW did we get some great responses to them.  Particularly the exploratory testing tools.  I am pretty sure the reverse engineering of test cases from ad-hoc exploratory tests, and 1-click rich bug generation that sent ALL THE DATA EVER to developers gave a few spectators the chills. I certainly got a lot of jaws dropping and comments like “THIS is a Microsoft tool?!” and “I wish I had this right now!”. It was pretty great.

I was also fortunate enough to also get to attend a few pre-conference workshops, keynotes and a session or two.  I have to say, WOW, the conference is really expanding, and I was very impressed with the quality of the speakers and breadth of content.  As a born again agilista, I was so pleasantly surprised to see an entire TRACK on Agile with some great topics.  I was able to attend “Transition to Agile Testing” and “Test Assessments: Practical Steps to Assessing the Maturity of your Organization“ and learned quite a bit in both sessions.  One disappointment, there is even more FUD out there in the QA world than what I see in the developer world when it comes to Agile, what it actually means and how it SHOULD be practiced.  I’m not about being a hard core “to the letter” Scrummer or anything, but I also am not about doing it wrong, calling it Agile, and blaming the failure on some fundamental problem with Agile.  There are lots of Agile practices that can be adopted to improve how you build, test and deliver software, without going “all in”, and that was something I kept trying to convey whenever I spoke up.

I heard “Agile is all about documenting as little as possible”, “Agile lacks discipline”, “Agile is about building software faster”, and all of the usual suspects you would expect to hear.  No, it’s about "documenting only as much as is necessary; there is a difference!  Agile requires MORE discipline actually.  People on Agile teams don’t work faster, they just deliver value to the business SOONER than in traditional waterfall models, which sure, can be argued is “faster” in terms of time to market.  The only thing that will make me work faster would be a better laptop and typing lessons.  I still look at the keyboard, I know :: sigh::   I am highly considering doing a session next year on Mythbusting Agile and Scrum, to help people understand both the law and the spirit of Agile practices.  Overall it was great to see that the QA community is also embracing Agile and attempting to collaborate better with the development side of the house. We just need the development side to do the same Winking smile  I also met at least a dozen certified Scrum Masters in my workshops as well, which was great to see! 

One of my favorite parts of the conference was of course getting to catch up and talk tech with Brian Harry.  He was the first keynote presenter of the conference, and spoke on how Microsoft “does Agile”, the failures and successes along the way, and even spent some time talking about his personal experiences as a manager learning to work in an Agile environment. I.LOVED.THIS. Yeah, I’m a bit of a Brian Harry fan-girl, but it really was a fantastic talk, and I had many people approach me in the booth later to comment on how much they enjoyed it. My favorite part was Brian admitting that at first, even HE was uncomfortable with the changes. It FELT like he was losing control of the team, but he eventually saw that he had BETTER visibility and MORE control over the process, and consequently the software teams.  It was brilliant.  So many managers FEAR Agile and Scrum for just those reasons. It’s uncomfortable letting teams self organize, trusting them to deliver value more often without constant and overwhelming oversight by project managers, and living without a 2 year detailed project plan - that in all actuality is outdated and invalid as little as a week into the project.  Wait, WHY is that scary? Sorry, couldn’t let that get by.

And so off I go again, into the software world, inspired to keep trying to get through to the Agile doubters and nay-sayers, and to help teams to adopt Agile practices and tooling to deliver better software, sooner.

Tags:

Agile | ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS 2010 | SDLC | Team Foundation Server | Testing | Test Case Management | User Acceptance Testing | VS 11 Beta | VS 2010 | Visual Studio | development

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May Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group–Let’s talk about TFS Service, VS 11 and TFS 11

by Angela 27. April 2012 05:39

Due to very popular demand to hold a VS 11 session out the the burbs, we are repeating the session held at the Aon Center in February, and are tweaking it a bit. Topics to be covered will include (but are not excluded to):

  1. ALM Ranger Guidance
  2. TFS Service Preview, a.k.a. TFS in the Cloud – what is it all about?
  3. New Agile Planning Tools
  4. Client Feedback Tool
  5. Story Boarding tool
  6. Team Explorer Changes (the code review feature is pretty hot!)

We may add some more items to that list, or refine it a bit, so be sure to check back closer to the meeting for more specifics.  And certainly let me know if you have any special requests!

Location: Microsoft Office - 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove, IL

When: Wednesday May 23rd, 6:30PM dinner followed by presentations and demos

Register here!  Please do register, as the security desk REQUIRES a list of folks to allow into the building at least 24 hours in advance.   And do keep in mind that we do our best to order food based on the number of attendees. IOW, if you need to cancel PLEASE let us know so we can adjust the food order so as not to waste our limited funding, well and of course food. Let’s NOT be wasting food.

Speakers

Prasanna Ramkumar is a Senior Consultant for Magenic Technologies and a VS ALM Ranger. He has extensive experience in implementing custom solutions using Microsoft development technologies for Magenic’s clients and provides ALM consulting to them using TFS. He has led and mentored several client projects using Scrum and is well versed in Agile methodologies. As a Ranger, Prasanna has been creating the hands on labs for the upcoming TFS11 Project Guidance and is actively reviewing other projects guidance.

Jim Szubryt is the TFS Product Manager and ALM Team Manager for the Enterprise Workforce at Accenture in Chicago. Jim’s TFS Team supports 1,300 developers in the global development centers. The ALM Team provides ALM guidance and assessments of the internally developed applications. Jim is also in the VS ALM Rangers program and has worked on the CodedUI guidance, TFS11 Upgrade guidance and TFS11 guidance on Teams. Prior to Accenture Jim worked at Magenic Technologies where he implemented TFS for clients and worked on a wide range of development projects.

Angela Dugan is the ALM Practice Manager for Polaris Solutions. Prior to joining Polaris, Angela Dugan was a technology evangelist with Microsoft focusing on Visual Studio and TFS group for over 5 years, and a software developer and architect for a small consulting firm in the western suburbs of Chicago for 8 years before that.

Tags:

ALM | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | SDLC | TFS | Team Foundation Server | Test Case Management | User Acceptance Testing | VS 11 Beta | Visual Studio | Testing | Work Item Tracking | development | TFS Rangers

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