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Receiving Random 403 Forbidden Errors on Your TFS SharePoint site? I Was.

by Angela 24. September 2013 16:57

So let’s start by explaining what was happening. I had just unraveled a mess of TFS/SharePoint/Reporting security that rivaled improperly-put-away-Christmas-lights levels of tangled.  All kinds of duplication, broken inheritance because of inexperienced admins adding individuals (instead of the AD groups I had setup) at every level of the SharePoint hierarchy, you name it!  So one day I get a head-scratcher of an issue from a business user who is customizing a TFS SharePoint portal for a project.

They were trying to edit the queries behind a couple of custom TFS web parts and were getting “403 Forbidden” errors at seemingly random times.  It would work on Monday but be broken on Tuesday and work again Wednesday.

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I was not getting that error, but of course I am god of everything as the TFS admin, so there is little I cannot do.  But I also noticed not many other folks were experiencing the issue, well, to be precise not one other person was receiving the error.  In the same AD groups, in different AD groups, nada.  I verified all of the groups this person belonged to, checked and rechecked his AD group membership, made sure SharePoint still had all the correct security inheritance in place. Nothing was out of place. And every once in a while the user would be able to complete that same action again without the error. Seemingly, whenever I went in and performed the action he was being denied. What the WHAT?!? Now I was *really* intrigued. 

Needless to say, we did fix the issue, but not without some serious internet scouring. I was about to post to MSDN forums when i stumbled upon the issue.  This obscure Microsoft Support post fixed our problem.  So I should note for background purposes that this TFS instance began as a 2008 installation running against a super old version of WSS.  It has been upgraded twice, by me, and we are now happily running on TFS 2012.3 with WSS 3.0, and hopefully soon to be TFS 2013 and the latest release of SharePoint Server. The server had SURELY gone through the security updates described in the Support post.  But since no one used the TFS SharePoint sites until I came along and fixed all of the security, no one had encountered this super old issue until very recently. Luckily I was on-site when it did, because while frustrating, it was also fun to troubleshoot.  I am weird that way :)

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | TFS 2012 | TFS 2010 | TFS 2008 | TFS 2013 | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS Administration | TFS Upgrade

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Updating TFS 2012 RTM to TFS 2012.3, Always an Adventure

by Angela 8. August 2013 09:27

I often get asked to upgrade clients’ TFS instances to newer versions, apply updates, etc. and I swear it never “just works”.  Well, it did once, and it was a server I had literally JUST upgraded personally to TFS 2012 that no one had touched since Smile with tongue out  My challenges in upgrading TFS instances are rarely due to problems with TFS itself.  99% of the time someone got paranoid about an account having ‘sysadmin’ rights on TFS databases, or Administrator rights on one of the TFS servers, and removed it without telling anyone and suddenly boom!  Of course “boom” doesn’t happen until I am in there maintaining the server or performing an upgrade... So, onto my story about update 3.

It seems every time I get error messages back from the TFS install wizard, they’re not documented (don’t get me started on that rant!), no one else has blogged about it, and no one has asked about it in a forum that I can find.  So I’m posting it myself so the next person to run into this doesn’t waste a lot of time troubleshooting.

So, I was upgrading from TFS 2012.0 to TFS 2012.3.  I upgraded the server from TFS 2010 on SQL 2008 to TFS 2012 on SQL 2012 myself back in January of this year, with just a few minor hiccups. I returned to the client recently to do some customizations to discover they had undone some of the security setup I worked on. :: heavy sigh::  After granting my account all the necessary rights to effectively administer TFS I started working on the upgrade to TFS 2012.3.  About 20 minutes in I encountered this fun little error: “Error: TF400167: Installation failed for the package (patch_KB2815416) with the following status 0x80070643”

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So to me there were two places to focus for figuring out the issue.  1) figure out what that KB file was and why it was failing to install, and 2) check out the status 0x80070643 and what causes it.

First I tried simply searching on the error message “TF400167 Installation failed for the package”.  A lot of unrelated posts were returned, and a few potentially helpful ones in Japanese.  Alas I do not speak or read that language.  I did see a lot of references to needing to reboot the server in the posts I COULD read, which I did, to no avail.

Then I tried finding any references to KB2815416 and found exactly one, but alas it was not related to the issue I was having. Grrr.

I dug through the error logs, found the one related to that file (KB2815416), and noticed a host of errors including one saying “TFS 2012 timeout while waiting for worker process” and lots of warnings in the TFS logs about issues with the TFS application pool - [Info   @22:09:26.796] Waiting for worker process for application pool Microsoft Team Foundation Server Message Queue Application Pool to stop.  OK then, Guess I’ll restart the app tier and try to install Update 3 again. Still not working. FRACK!

So now I started focusing on the status being thrown back (0x80070643) and I start finding more helpful posts, though most of them related to much older releases of TFS.  Still, gave it a go.  So I’d already rebooted the server, restarted IIS, but then I noted Vicky’s comment about necessary permissions of the user.  Well, I know the user I am logged in as SHOULD have all of those permissions, because it did back in January when I upgraded to TFS 2012, but we’ve been here before with other clients haven’t we?  BINGO! The TFS admin account I was using had its rights revoked on the SQL Server machine and databases. It was a general TFS Admin account that was shared too, not just Angela-consultant account, so that could have been a big problem for someone. Why, WHY does this happen everywhere I go?!?  So I added the TFS admin account back to the server admin group, and gave it sysadmin on the TFS databases, and finished up the upgrade nicely. Good thing I get paid by the hour, I guess.

The only other things I had to do was rebuild the data warehouse (through the admin console) and rebuild the cube to get reports back up and running.  And even though I manually ran the scheduled backup job after the upgrade successfully, when the exact same job ran overnight it failed with error: “TFS database backup job failed with error: TF30040: The database is not correctly configured. Contact your Team Foundation Server administrator.System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException (0x80131904): Could not find stored procedure 'prc_TfsSetTransactionLogMark'.”

Next step is to recreate the backup job and hope that does the trick.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Upgrade | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio | Visual Studio 2012

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ThatConference – Mark Your Calendars and Call for Speakers is OPEN

by Angela 1. April 2013 16:43

So as a Midwesterner I often feel like we get screwed when it comes to big, cool tech conferences.  ALM Summit is always in Redmond, TechEd is always in Vegas or L.A. (blech), and there are a large number of other big tech conferences that are primarily only held on the West Coast (Mix, VS Live, etc.). So this big news so far this year has been that VS Live is coming to Chicago in May, for one. I’m pretty excited about that, especially with the sweet discount I was able to get for it (see the blog post I linked to above for a $500 discount code to VS Live Chicago). 

Now don’t get me wrong, we have a lot of great, smaller conferences, for instance Chicago Code Camp in a few weeks, and Deeper in .NET in Milwaukee next weekend, are both very good conferences and are both FREE to boot. But another awesome conference you may have missed out on last year was ThatConference. What conference? ThatConference. Yeah, I know, the name is clever, and sometimes confusing, but mostly clever.  It is the next big thing in my opinion, because not only is it owned by, organized by, and delivered by people you know from your local community, but the range of topics is pretty amazing too.  .NET, Ruby, Java, iPhone, Android, Windows Phone, Tablet, Surface, iPad, you name a technology/platform and it is probably going to be represented there.

As an added bonus, it is a VERY family friendly conference being held at an awesome water park in the Wisconsin Dells, just 3.5 hours from Chicago if you live in my neck of the woods.  Kalahari Resort also has go-karts, laser tag, a large arcade, an indoor ferris wheel, a number of great restaurants and bars, and even a salon and spa if you need a little R&R with your tech!  Stay a few extra days, the room rates are amazing and last year we also got some pretty nice perks (a.k.a. free stuff) from the resort because we were attending the conference.

Call for speakers just opened today and is only open for 2 weeks so hurry up and get your submissions in! Don’t worry if you think your topic is too broad, too niche, too whatever, just get it in there.  There is a great submission guide available on the session submission site too so check it out! The range of topics being accepted is pretty large, as we hope to provide a really well rounded set of options for attendees.  If you have more questions, or would like some help creating your session write-up, join us every Wednesday at noon CST for Q&A on G+.

 

Hope to see you, and your sessions, at ThatConference this summer!

August 12th - 14th, 2013

Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, WI

 

ThatConference is also on facebook, or Google Groups if you have questions or comments for the world at large.

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Chicago Code Camp 2013–It’s Awesome and it’s FREE

by Angela 22. March 2013 12:54
What is Chicago Code Camp? Well, it’s in its fifth year of awesomeness and if you haven’t checked it out, go do it now.  CCC is a free, community-driven developer conference. Over 350 people have already registered so far! This year, they’ve even adding a full day of Windows Azure boot camp.

 

So if you’ve been to CCC before, go ahead and stop reading because you’ve already registered and know what an amazing free event this is, right?  If you’ve never been, well, it is worth the trip up North (or South if you are in Wisconsin)!  Chicago Code Camp is free, and covers a WIDE variety of great tech topics.  As someone clearly passionate about ALM, I was particularly happy to see the number of ALM related topics at CCC this year, and as usual the speakers are really great too. 

So mark your calendars (April 27th to be specific) and register right now!

 

Here is just a sampling of the ALM sessions:

- Introduction to Git and Github - [Joshua Gall, Aurora Healthcare]

- This *IS* Agile Development - [Gary Pedretti, Centare]

- Version control TFS 2012 - [Prasanna Ramkumar, Magenic]

- ALM with Visual Studio 2012 - [Raj Krishnan, Microsoft]

- TFS 2012 - [James Szubryt, Accenture]

 

More great sessions and speakers are outlined here: http://www.chicagocodecamp.com/Public/Schedule.  Stoked yet? You should be.  Did I mention this is also FREE?

 

Click here to register for Chicago Code Camp 2013

 

19351 W Washington Street Grayslake, IL 60030

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Tags:

.NET 4.5 | ALM | ASP.NET | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | Azure | Cloud Computing | HTML5 | MSDN | SDLC | TFS 2012 | Powershell | Productivity | TFS | Team Foundation Server | Testing | Visual Studio 2012 | Visual Studio | Windows 8 | development | git

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March 27th - Chicago VS ALM User Group Talks About VS 2012 Updates Released So Far

by Angela 11. March 2013 12:21

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In case you missed it, the Visual Studio ALM product team has been BUSY.  While they release cool, new goodies to TFS Service on a weekly basis, releases to on-premise TFS happen about once a quarter these days. In the last 5 months, they have made available 2 major updates to Visual Studio and TFS 2012; specifically VS 2012 Update 1 and recently, CTP 4 of Update 2.  Just a few of my favorite new features that we plan to demo on March 27th include a web client for Microsoft Test Manager, customizable Kanban columns, support for Git, and work item tagging.  And there is a LOT more that we probably won’t even have time to talk about in depth.  Can’t make it to the user group meeting? Be sure to download and install Update 1, and Update 2 CTP 4 and see the new features for yourself! It is even a “go-live”, which you can read more about on Brian’s blog.

 

Join Us Wednesday, March 27, 2013 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM

Description:  As you probably know, the Microsoft Team Foundation Server team has moved to a more regular cadence of pushing out updates to Team Foundation Server (TFS) and Visual Studio. In the last few months we've seen 2 major updates released to on-premise TFS 2012 and Visual Studio 2012 (Update 1, and Update 2 CTP 4), and many smaller and more frequent releases to TFS Service. There are far too many to cover in just one meeting so on March 27th we will be talking about the updates specific to the web-based Agile Planning tools, MTM and the TFS-Git integration.

Agenda:6:30PM - Dinner and networking, 7:00PM - Presentation and demos

Speaker Bios:  Edward Thomson is a Software Development Engineer at Microsoft, where he works on cross-platform version control tools for Team Foundation Server. Before joining Microsoft, Edward worked on numerous source code control tools for Microsoft and Unix platforms.  Angela Dugan is the ALM Practice manager for Polaris Solutions and spends most of her time migrating customers to TFS and streamlining their software delivery processes. She has over 14 years of experience in the software industry including 5.5 years as a Microsoft ALM Tools evangelist and over a year as Polaris Solution’s practice manager focusing specifically on Visual Studio and TFS.

Bonus speaker: Martin Hinshelwood is going to be in town and is going to tag-team with Ed and I to cover even MORE great Update 1 & 2 features! Martin is a Senior ALM Consultant at Northwest Cadence, is a Microsoft Visual Studio ALM MVP and a certified Professional Scrum trainer.

 

Location: Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago – you can park in the Aon center for a discounted rate after 6pm, but your best bet may be SpotHero if you choose to drive. I’ve seen $8 parking ½ block away using their service.

As always, please be sure to register as Aon Center security will NOT allow individuals to access the building without being pre-registered. http://chicagoalmug.org/

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VS 2012 Web Client for Manual Testing

by Angela 11. March 2013 11:53

So in case you’ve missed my excited tweets/blog posts on what is coming in VS2012 Update 2, I wanted to spend a little time covering one of my favorites. If you’re a TFS Service user you’ve probably already seen this, but occasionally I run across people who go into autopilot and miss the new bells and whistled that magically appear every week or two. I know I have done it.

One of the features that recently showed up on TFS Service is a web client for Microsoft Test Manager, specifically around manual test execution. “WHAT?!” you say? YES, indeed. Now you can view test plans and test suites (they need to be created using the MTM client right now), create and manage test cases, execute manual test cases and create rich bugs FROM YOUR BROWSER ::head explodes from the awesome:: This will revolutionize tesst case execution for some of my clients that have been a little uneasy about installing the MTM client on all of their environments, and on end user tester’s machines. It does not have full feature parity with the full Microsoft Test Manager product (yet) but Microsoft has discussed the possibility of growing these tools over time. Here is a sneak peak of where those tools appear from within the Agile Planning web tools while logged into TFS Service (or if you have a test instance of TFS 2012 with Update 2 CTP 4 installed).

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Don’t laugh at my burndown report, it’s a demo project so it isn’t updated in real-time and sometimes looks less-than-ideal if I’ve gone too long without doing a demo. 

Again, unless you have installed VS 2012 Update 2 CTP4 on your on-premise TFS server you will only be able to access these testing tools from a TFS Service instance, and I would NOT recommend putting a CTP on production (YMMV of course). That being said, let’s take a super quick look at what else you get with this new feature. 

Here is a view of a simple test plan with a couple of Test Suites and a handful of test cases already assigned to those suites.  Note you have options to: create new manual test cases, edit existing manual test cases, remove test cases from test suites, set Outcome to Pass/Fail/Blocked/Not Applicable and quite a bit more! I specifically say MANUAL test cases because exploratory testing is not currently supported on the web. You can also, at a glance, see who is assigned to execute each test case, the target environment configuration, as well as recent Outcome. You can even filter by tester and outcome!

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On of my favorite productivity features is the ability to open the test case in the same window as the management tools, and edit it on the fly. You have similar capabilities in MTM in the Track Tab, ir if editing other types of work items in Team Explorer, and I definitely have wanted this ability in MTM for a while now so I love this!  Maybe a small enhancement, but as I spend a lot of time in MTM, any avoided clicks are a time saver for me and it adds up over time. In the upper right-hand section of the web tools you can see a “test case pane” option which can be set to Off, bottom or right. What you see below is the “bottom” option, and in the previous screenshot you may now notice it was set to “off”.

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Another feature I will show off in this post is the actual running of a manual test case, which is similar to the desktop client version of the Manual Test Runner tool with a few caveats.  Note you still see each step, expected results, and data driven fields are still provided for the user running the test.  You can also set Outcomes for each step (pass/fail) as well as for the test case as a whole (pass/fail/blocked/not applicable). Notice you also have the ability to pause test case execution which is a feature of MTM 2012 in general :

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An important thing to notice that is absent is rich text support in the test runner itself. You also do not have a built-in tool for snagging screenshots. A bummer, but not the end of the world when you consider the major benefits that a light-weight, no-install testing tool gives you. 

The last feature I want to highlight is rich bug creation from a test execution session. The support for rich bug creation has always been a really nice advantage of MTM, and the web tool gives you many of the key features that makes TFS such a clear win for defect tracking. Not all of the data collection is supported right now, but the big ones for me have always been repro steps and traceability which is there, as you can see:

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Again this is meant to be lightweight, and hey, you never know what you might see in a future update!

There is a LOT more that I could cover, but this is really just a pleasure cruise around the highlights of the new web client for doing manual testing. If you want to learn more about MTM, agile testing, and pretty much anything new and cool in the area of Quality Assurance, check out Anu’s blog, it has always been an INVALUABLE resource. Also be sure to download and read the Test Release Management Guidance released very recently by the ALM Rangers.  It can help lead you down the right path in terms of managing your test plans based on your team’s process and product release cycles.

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