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September 25th, 2013 Edition of the Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group: Visual Studio ALM 2013

by Angela 17. September 2013 09:29

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Well, with all the excitement of ThatConference, I skipped having an August meeting but we’re back! 

With the upcoming release of Visual Studio ALM 2013 tools, it seemed necessary to spend some time digging in! Jim and I will be spending this meeting talking about what's new and cool. We are still arm wrestling over who gets to demo what features, so for now just know it will be awesome! :)

And don't forget to get your fresh downloads of TFS and VS 2013 RC today. MSDN subscribers will also find everything they need through their Subscription site.  If you’re interested in participating in the virtual launch event on November 13th, be sure to check out the VS 2013 Launch Site and sign up soon!

Meeting Date: Wednesday September 25th

Agenda:6:30 - Dinner, 7:00 Presentation

Location:Microsoft-Downers Grove 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove

Registration:      http://chicagoalmug.org/ 

PLEASE NOTE: Security has gotten tighter at the Downers Grove building.  You MUST register as building security will NOT allow individuals to access the building without being pre-registered.  Their rules, not mine.

 

 

Speaker Bio:

Angela Dugan is the Polaris Solutions ALM Practice Manager. She focuses on TFS implementation and customization in the real world, Visual Studio related training and mentoring, and helping organizations to adopt Agile/Scrum methodologies. Angela had spent the previous 14 years as a custom application developer with a small consulting firm in Chicago, as well as did 5 years at Microsoft as an ALM evangelist. Catch up with her adventures on her blog.

Outside of wrangling TFS, Angela is an avid board gamer, an aspiring runner (up to 2.3 miles without vomiting!), and a Twitter addict. She lives in a 102 year old house in Oak Park that she is constantly working on with her husband David.

Jim Szubryt manages the application architecture team for the Enterprise Workforce at Accenture in Chicago. This responsibility includes managing the TFS Team that supports 2,500 developers in the global development centers. He has worked with the global teams on implementing ALM practices and his team is in the process of piloting TFS 2013.

He is also a Microsoft ALM MVP and a Microsoft Visual Studio ALM Ranger. He was project lead on the disaster recovery planning guidance that was published in March. Currently he is the Project Lead on the Ranger’s guidance for reporting with TFS 2012. Prior to becoming a project Lead he has written parts of the TFS 2012 upgrade guidance and the TFS Server guidance that are found on CodePlex.  His blog can be found here.

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VS 2012 Web Client for Manual Testing

by Angela 11. March 2013 11:53

So in case you’ve missed my excited tweets/blog posts on what is coming in VS2012 Update 2, I wanted to spend a little time covering one of my favorites. If you’re a TFS Service user you’ve probably already seen this, but occasionally I run across people who go into autopilot and miss the new bells and whistled that magically appear every week or two. I know I have done it.

One of the features that recently showed up on TFS Service is a web client for Microsoft Test Manager, specifically around manual test execution. “WHAT?!” you say? YES, indeed. Now you can view test plans and test suites (they need to be created using the MTM client right now), create and manage test cases, execute manual test cases and create rich bugs FROM YOUR BROWSER ::head explodes from the awesome:: This will revolutionize tesst case execution for some of my clients that have been a little uneasy about installing the MTM client on all of their environments, and on end user tester’s machines. It does not have full feature parity with the full Microsoft Test Manager product (yet) but Microsoft has discussed the possibility of growing these tools over time. Here is a sneak peak of where those tools appear from within the Agile Planning web tools while logged into TFS Service (or if you have a test instance of TFS 2012 with Update 2 CTP 4 installed).

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Don’t laugh at my burndown report, it’s a demo project so it isn’t updated in real-time and sometimes looks less-than-ideal if I’ve gone too long without doing a demo. 

Again, unless you have installed VS 2012 Update 2 CTP4 on your on-premise TFS server you will only be able to access these testing tools from a TFS Service instance, and I would NOT recommend putting a CTP on production (YMMV of course). That being said, let’s take a super quick look at what else you get with this new feature. 

Here is a view of a simple test plan with a couple of Test Suites and a handful of test cases already assigned to those suites.  Note you have options to: create new manual test cases, edit existing manual test cases, remove test cases from test suites, set Outcome to Pass/Fail/Blocked/Not Applicable and quite a bit more! I specifically say MANUAL test cases because exploratory testing is not currently supported on the web. You can also, at a glance, see who is assigned to execute each test case, the target environment configuration, as well as recent Outcome. You can even filter by tester and outcome!

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On of my favorite productivity features is the ability to open the test case in the same window as the management tools, and edit it on the fly. You have similar capabilities in MTM in the Track Tab, ir if editing other types of work items in Team Explorer, and I definitely have wanted this ability in MTM for a while now so I love this!  Maybe a small enhancement, but as I spend a lot of time in MTM, any avoided clicks are a time saver for me and it adds up over time. In the upper right-hand section of the web tools you can see a “test case pane” option which can be set to Off, bottom or right. What you see below is the “bottom” option, and in the previous screenshot you may now notice it was set to “off”.

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Another feature I will show off in this post is the actual running of a manual test case, which is similar to the desktop client version of the Manual Test Runner tool with a few caveats.  Note you still see each step, expected results, and data driven fields are still provided for the user running the test.  You can also set Outcomes for each step (pass/fail) as well as for the test case as a whole (pass/fail/blocked/not applicable). Notice you also have the ability to pause test case execution which is a feature of MTM 2012 in general :

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An important thing to notice that is absent is rich text support in the test runner itself. You also do not have a built-in tool for snagging screenshots. A bummer, but not the end of the world when you consider the major benefits that a light-weight, no-install testing tool gives you. 

The last feature I want to highlight is rich bug creation from a test execution session. The support for rich bug creation has always been a really nice advantage of MTM, and the web tool gives you many of the key features that makes TFS such a clear win for defect tracking. Not all of the data collection is supported right now, but the big ones for me have always been repro steps and traceability which is there, as you can see:

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Again this is meant to be lightweight, and hey, you never know what you might see in a future update!

There is a LOT more that I could cover, but this is really just a pleasure cruise around the highlights of the new web client for doing manual testing. If you want to learn more about MTM, agile testing, and pretty much anything new and cool in the area of Quality Assurance, check out Anu’s blog, it has always been an INVALUABLE resource. Also be sure to download and read the Test Release Management Guidance released very recently by the ALM Rangers.  It can help lead you down the right path in terms of managing your test plans based on your team’s process and product release cycles.

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So I ran into this issue today while creating a TFS 2010 Backup Plan

by Angela 31. October 2012 13:30

So as you would expect, I as a consultant do not have god-like access to things in production like I do in the dev and test environments.  So occasionally I get tripped up on access rights, and when it comes to TFS, well, they could do a much better job of listing out all the places where you do and do not need Admin rights, sysadmin rights, farm admin rights… Well, it’s all out there between the Ranger Guidance, best practices documents, install docs and MSDN documentation but you have to do a LOT of cross referencing to get it all.  And sure, ideally anyone who is a TFS admin would be able to just ask nice and smile and get all those rights, but this is the real world and many large companies are PARANOID about handing out access like that to production.  I had to fight to get the minimal rights documented in the TFS guidance, let alone anything extra.

While upgrading TFS 2010 to 2012 at this current client, I am stopped dead in my tracks at least a few times a week, sometimes a few times a day, by “Access Denied”. My most recent one was extra tricky because it involved a Power Tool and as you know, those are often not documented very well. So, on to my story…  I was setting up a Backup Plan on TFS 2010 using the nifty Power Tools feature (see screen below) from the Admin console.  I login to the TFS application tier with my account, a TFS Admin user.  I know that my account has sysadmin rights on SQL because I am a TFS Admin, and when it comes time to providing the account to run the backup plan under I provided the TFSService account which I know has Administrator and sysadmin rights on the data tier server:

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So between those two accounts I would think everything was OK. I don’t know for sure, but if the Backup Plan is running as the TFSService account the way it is setup here, well that account is king of the world so everything should “just work”. And yet:

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So to hopefully make this something that comes up when someone else does a search on this message, here is what I saw - “Error    [ Backup Plan Verifications ] The current username failed to retrieve MSSQL Server service account. Please make sure you have permissions to retrieve this information.” 

WTH?! And when I opened up the error log the first error I encountered was:

TFS upgrade xp_regread() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.' xp_regread() returned error 5, 'Access is denied.' 

Again, WTH?!

So the DBA goes off and starts researching what xp_regread() does, and tried to figure out why this isn’t an issue in our dev and test environments given that everything was setup the same, and I start digging through forums.  Finally I find one sad and lonely little post on the MSDN forums related to the issue that recommends 1) logging in as a TFS Admin user (OK, I’m with you) and 2) “ensure that the user who perform this Backup Plan have required permission in SQL Server”.  Wait, what?  Be more specific please. What *ARE* the required permissions??  This happens all the time. Don’t tell me to “make sure you have appropriate permissions” without clarifying what those are. Otherwise, well, duh! I *think* I have the right permissions but clearly I am mistaken.

I dig through the Ranger Guidance which as far as I can tell is the only place this tool is documented.  It doesn’t say the person CREATING the backup plan has to be an admin on SQL, and it IMPLIES the account specified to run the job has to be an ADMINISTRATOR but only because the example specified a  Administrator account. Here, right from the guidance:

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But even that doesn’t necessarily imply a SQL admin, and nowhere in the doc does it say what rights either account (logged in user or “Account”) should have. I just went back and read it AGAIN, does not say anything IRT rights of either of those users in the Guidance. I suppose if you knew what it was doing behind the scenes you could infer the rights needed from the MSDN docs (I found this later). I made an educated guess that because in dev and test I am a server Administrator on the DT, and the Backup worked just fine there, that me being a SQL Server Admin must be a requirement.  So I logged back into my production TFS AT with another account that I knew was admin on every server in the TFS implementation (I know, I know), and the backup plan was created just fine. .

Our DBA does NOT like making TFS admin accounts SQL Administrators, but if I can show him explicit rules that say YOU CANNOT DO YOUR JOB AS A TFS ADMIN WITHOUT IT, he will do it.  So please Microsoft, don’t make it so darn difficult to divine what rights all of the accounts need for the various tasks the user will do. Particularly the Power Tools which make people nervous anyway.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | MSDN | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS 2010 | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Rangers

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May Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group–Let’s talk about TFS Service, VS 11 and TFS 11

by Angela 27. April 2012 05:39

Due to very popular demand to hold a VS 11 session out the the burbs, we are repeating the session held at the Aon Center in February, and are tweaking it a bit. Topics to be covered will include (but are not excluded to):

  1. ALM Ranger Guidance
  2. TFS Service Preview, a.k.a. TFS in the Cloud – what is it all about?
  3. New Agile Planning Tools
  4. Client Feedback Tool
  5. Story Boarding tool
  6. Team Explorer Changes (the code review feature is pretty hot!)

We may add some more items to that list, or refine it a bit, so be sure to check back closer to the meeting for more specifics.  And certainly let me know if you have any special requests!

Location: Microsoft Office - 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove, IL

When: Wednesday May 23rd, 6:30PM dinner followed by presentations and demos

Register here!  Please do register, as the security desk REQUIRES a list of folks to allow into the building at least 24 hours in advance.   And do keep in mind that we do our best to order food based on the number of attendees. IOW, if you need to cancel PLEASE let us know so we can adjust the food order so as not to waste our limited funding, well and of course food. Let’s NOT be wasting food.

Speakers

Prasanna Ramkumar is a Senior Consultant for Magenic Technologies and a VS ALM Ranger. He has extensive experience in implementing custom solutions using Microsoft development technologies for Magenic’s clients and provides ALM consulting to them using TFS. He has led and mentored several client projects using Scrum and is well versed in Agile methodologies. As a Ranger, Prasanna has been creating the hands on labs for the upcoming TFS11 Project Guidance and is actively reviewing other projects guidance.

Jim Szubryt is the TFS Product Manager and ALM Team Manager for the Enterprise Workforce at Accenture in Chicago. Jim’s TFS Team supports 1,300 developers in the global development centers. The ALM Team provides ALM guidance and assessments of the internally developed applications. Jim is also in the VS ALM Rangers program and has worked on the CodedUI guidance, TFS11 Upgrade guidance and TFS11 guidance on Teams. Prior to Accenture Jim worked at Magenic Technologies where he implemented TFS for clients and worked on a wide range of development projects.

Angela Dugan is the ALM Practice Manager for Polaris Solutions. Prior to joining Polaris, Angela Dugan was a technology evangelist with Microsoft focusing on Visual Studio and TFS group for over 5 years, and a software developer and architect for a small consulting firm in the western suburbs of Chicago for 8 years before that.

Tags:

ALM | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | SDLC | TFS | Team Foundation Server | Test Case Management | User Acceptance Testing | VS 11 Beta | Visual Studio | Testing | Work Item Tracking | development | TFS Rangers

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