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Setting Default Values on a Readonly work item field in TFS 2013

by Angela 4. March 2015 14:07

It’s actually a bit more complicated than that… What I was trying to do was set the Assigned To field on a NEW work item to a particular person, and then lock it in.  So new work items of a specific type can only ever be assigned to a particular person… The Assigned to dropdown would only ever get the full list of team members after it was transitioned away from the New state.

I tried a lot of things that felt like they SHOULD have worked. It appeared that I could do either set a field default, or make it read-only, but not both.  Here are the things I tried:

  1. I tried setting the field itself to both have a default value and be read-only at the field definition level, but it appears as a read-only blank field.
  2. I tried setting the field to have the default value, then added a WHEN clause to the field to set it to read-only when System.State = new. It appears as a read-only blank field.
  3. I tried setting the field to be read-only, then added a WHEN clause to set the field Default value during the transition into the new state (see below). It appears as a read-only blank field.
  4. I tried setting the field to have the default value, then set the field to read-only during the transition into the new state (see below). It appears as a read-only blank field.
  5. I tried setting the Assigned to field to be both set with a default value, and set to read-only in the New transition. Nothing was set at the field level. It appears as a read-only blank field.

Is read-only always processed before default value rules are set regardless of how you do it? I wasn’t sure, and I did run across the order of operations docs and it does not address read-only. :: SIGH::

If I remove the Read-only rule from every approach, the field defaults properly, making me think what I want to do is just not supported.  After scouring a lot of MSDN documentation, I have no reason to think otherwise but when I find out for sure I’ll let you know. Anyone see something else I am doing wrong? Or know for sure if it is supported or not? If so, please let me know! It’s kind of driving me crazy.  In the meantime, I did think of a workaround.   Instead of making the field read-only, I reduced the valid choices in the drop down while the item is in the new state to the one person it can be.  Not exactly read-only, but they can't change it to another value so it is effectively read-only...

<FieldDefinition name="Assigned To" refname="System.AssignedTo" type="String" syncnamechanges="true" reportable="dimension">
  <ALLOWEXISTINGVALUE />
  <ALLOWEDVALUES expanditems="true">
    <LISTITEM value="[project]\Analysts" />
  </ALLOWEDVALUES>
  <DEFAULT from="value" value="Joy" />
  <VALIDUSER />
  <WHEN field="System.State" value="New">
    <ALLOWEDVALUES expanditems="true">
      <LISTITEM value="Joy" />
    </ALLOWEDVALUES>
  </WHEN>
</FieldDefinition>

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St Louis Day of .NET – Links to Blogs and Decks for all Polaris Speakers

by Angela 24. November 2014 15:22

This year was the second year that Polaris Solutions sponsored St. Louis Day of .NET.  In case you’re wondering why were sponsor a conference in St Louis, a) it’s a really great conference, and b) we have an office down there, a quickly growing one too! So if you missed it this year, stay tuned for STLDODN 2015! Outside of ThatConference, it is one of the most affordable, local conference that I have even been a part of. It was focused on Microsoft and .NET technologies, but also included a lot of talks around test automation, deployment and release management, and agile and scrum.

If you did attend, I wanted to make sure to point you at my slide decks, as well as the blogs and slide decks of some of our other presenters. If you missed them, I spoke on both TFS deployment and management as well as agile adoption, Josh did presentations on machine learning with Azure and ASP.NET identify framework, Clint did a really great presentation on Application Architecture and another on Advanced OOP, and Jeff talked about a topic near and dear to my hear as well – TFS Consolidation and migrations.  If you attended the pre-compiler sessions you may have even run across our newest Polarian – Alejandro Ramirez. Great stuff, all of them! Here is a roundup of how to find more information on those speakers, and to get their slides:

  • Angela Dugan: You’re already on my blog :) slides are here
  • Clint Edmonson: Blog and slides
  • Josh Gillespie: Blog and slides
  • Jeff Przylucki: Blog and slides to be posted soon, check back in a few days!
  • Alejandro Ramirez:Blog and slides

 

A couple of us even made it into the podcast line-up while there as well! I’ll be appearing on an upcoming edition of Technology and Friends, and both myself and Alejandro got a chance to sit down with the great team behind St Louis Tech Talks

Lastly, be sure to check out the STLDODN twitter feed (and search on #STLDODN) for some great tweets, links to the other great podcast episodes recorded live during the conference, as well as links to some of the other presentations.

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What Conference? Yeah ThatConference

by Angela 15. May 2014 08:49

With so many conferences, it’s easy for one to get lost in the noise. But don’t let that happen with ThatConference. I know, “but Angela you’re on the conference committee, of course you think I should go”. It’s true, for several years now I’ve been working with the ThatConference gang to keep this thing growing and thriving, but it’s because I believe in it. We don’t get paid, we get nothing out of being on the committee other than knowing we got to help provide this awesome event to the community we are so proud to be a part of. OK, now I’m getting all sappy so let’s move on. The point is, this conference is literally organized by a bunch of us techies and geeks like you, not huge corporations or software vendors with an agenda or licenses to sell.  We strive to make the conference fun, educational, and family-friendly. So I mean it when I say this conference is FOR YOU.

Tickets went on sale today, and you may have noticed a slight uptick in prices. Yeah, things get more expensive every year, that’s life, but is STILL an incredible value at $399. That includes 3 full days of amazing sessions (125+ to choose from!) AND lots of networking opportunities AND a pig roast AND a private water park party just for ThatConference attendees AND a Bacon bar AND multiple social events AND a game night (I might be biased as I am running this one, but seriously, BOARD GAMES!!). That was a lot of ANDs for your money. And if you buy soon you can get an Early Bird discount of $25 making the conference just $374.99. You also get a discounted nightly rate at the water park resort if you’re not a local, which gets you some nice additional perks (last year we got free passes to the Ducks and Tommy Bartlett show with our room). That’s an incredibly inexpensive conference that you can combine with a great family summer vacation in the Wisconsin Dells! The topics being covered this year are incredibly diverse, I’d need a few paragraphs more just to cover them all and no one wants to read that much so check out the full conference schedule here. And don’t be afraid to ask your boss to sponsor your ticket, and maybe send a few of your coworkers too!  If they have any budget set aside for training, I can’t think of a better way to use it.  You’ll get exposed to a far wider range of topics and our food is WAY better too ;)

As you might know if you are a returning camper, we also have a great program for the families, so bring the significant others and kids if you have them. It’s a last hurrah before school at a water park and indoor amusement park. You’ll be a HERO and you still get to go geek out at a tech conference! If you purchase family tickets along with your conference ticket, family members are just $39.99 per person, or $29.99 if purchased before 5/22. That means the entire family can join us at ThatConference social events, the pig roast, game night, a craft night that I organize just for the kids, and of course an entire track devoted to family friendly geekery. And trust me when I say the family sessions will blow their minds! Last year my 10 year old nephew was introduced to programming for the first time (he even used Visual Studio for one session!), and ended up stealing my laptop so he could play around with it some more. How cool is that?!  This year we even have a couple of session being run by kid campers from last year! There’s even a session on writing Minecraft Mods. I know right? The family schedule is here, and it’s REALLY good so look it over, show it to your kids, then sign them up!

Hope to see you In August! Now go sign up, seriously right now, go do it.

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Chicago ALM User Group – April is All About Effective TFS Management

by Angela 16. April 2014 09:07

So as an ALM consultant, I work with a LOT of customers to “clean up” their ALM implementation, and spend a lot of time talking about proper care and feeding of their TFS environment.

Installing TFS is relatively easy, but configuring it to support your organization structure over the long haul can be challenging. How many team project collections do you need? When do you create new team projects? Which process templates should you use? How much should you customize? These are important considerations, and making the wrong choice can cause major headaches down the road. At this installment of the Chicago ALM user group, I’ll be reviewing best practices, discussing the ins and outs of how to structure your TFS projects, and get your most burning questions about TFS configuration answered!

I hope to see you in Downers Grove next week. Please be sure to register soon so I can order the right amount of food and so that the security folks will let you in!

When: Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Where:  Microsoft-Downers Grove 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove

 

And don’t forget, VS Live is coming to Chicago in early May, and friends of the Chicago ALM user group get a $500 discount code! More details here: http://t.co/LdzaiCR6O9.

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The Many Templates of TFS

by Angela 23. January 2014 15:41

If you are a TFS user, especially if you are a TFS administrator, then you know that with every release of Team Foundation Server that there is a rev of the process templates. And if you work on a TFS server that has gone through a number of upgrades, it is possible that your Process Template Manager dialog will start to look like this:

image

So many choices!! Which one to choose? Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh… ::cough, cough:: Back in the early days, there were only 2 out of the box templates. I know, craziness! How did people survive with only Agile and CMMI? Well, there were always the custom templates that you could get off the internet, but that is a can of worms I am not opening in this post.  For now I want to focus solely on the OOB templates.

Over the years, the templates grew up, work item types got added, fields got renamed, workflows got streamlined, and in 2010 a new template was born. But who can remember which one came out with which version of TFS? Usually it’s not a big issue until you are working on a server with lots of legacy team projects, and you need to know what the original base template was. Pro tip, the TFS Team Project Manager can really help you to answer this question AND we found a bug that they recently fixed allowing you to compare 2013 templates all the way back to 2008 templates! Well, I started keeping track, and I get asked questions about this often enough that I figured I would just share my reference.

TFS Version CMMI Agile Scrum
2005 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 4.0 MSF For Agile Software Development 4.0 N/A -- 3rd party
2008 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 4.2 MSF For Agile Software Development 4.2 N/A -- 3rd party
2010 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 5.0 MSF For Agile Software Development 5.0 Visual Studio Scrum 1.0
2012 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 6.0 MSF For Agile Software Development 6.0 Visual Studio Scrum 2.0
2012.1 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 6.1 MSF For Agile Software Development 6.1 Visual Studio Scrum 2.2
2012.2 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 6.2 MSF For Agile Software Development 6.2 Visual Studio Scrum 2.2
2013 RC MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 7.0 MSF For Agile Software Development 7.0 Visual Studio Scrum 3.0
2013 RTM MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 2013 MSF For Agile Software Development 2013 Visual Studio Scrum 2013
2013 Update 2 MSF for CMMI Process Improvement 2013.2 MSF For Agile Software Development 2013.2 Visual Studio Scrum 2013.2

 

Now, I don’t *think* I have missed any versions here.  All of the major TFS releases, and some minor releases, have been covered.  But I’d love some feedback if you notice any minor versions that I may have missed. And I’ll come back and update this when TFS inevitably gets another update, and another rev of the templates :)

Tags:

Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | Scrum | Process Methodology | SDLC | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS 2008 | TFS 2010 | TFS 2012 | TFS 2013 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | CMMI | Process Templates

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Quick Tip on Debugging TFS30139 Issues

by Angela 12. December 2013 17:27

I’ve had a few people I know run into this recently, and there does not seem to be a lot of guidance out there about process template customization, in terms of troubleshooting or tips and tricks. While running through process template updates to move clients from TFS 2005/2008/2010 to TFS 2013 I would occasionally encounter one of the annoyances of working with XML by hand:

clip_image002

Oh THAT is helpful.  And if you’ve ever seen the contents of a process template you know this could be one of about a million different problems in hundreds of files.

Now if you do a lot of template customizations, well just stop it, right now, please. The more you customize the more you need to maintain, the more you potentially have to upgrade by hand when you move to a new version of TFS.  There are times when heavy customization is necessary, but I often find people customize without understanding what the OOB template does in the first place. Unless you are checking your templates into source control, being very methodical about isolating changes and testing, and commenting your changes just like you do with your application code, you’re going to run into problems during upgrading. But chances are you’ve already gone down the path and here you are…

Enter TFS consultants. I prefer to do most of my process template editing directly against the XML using Notepad when I can. I know, it’s a bit old school, but there are a lot of us out there so I figured why not share? Inevitably, you misspell something, miss a closing bracket, enter an errant blank space where it does not belong, the common XML “bugs” that can be really difficult to track down.  And as you know, Notepad does not have a debugger.  So like me, I’m sure at some point you’ve tried to upload an updated process template using the TFS Process Template manager and seen the dreaded “TFS30139: The process template is not configured properly.” ::SIGH:: Now what? Well, if you followed my previous advice and were methodically checking in distinct changes, you know what you last changed. Kind of like CI for process templates :)

Enter the power tools. The TFS Power Tools contains a great process template editor that you can use in place of a lot of the command line tools for importing and exporting work item type definitions. You’ll need to install it on a machine running Visual Studio Professional or better, FYI.

clip_image002[5]

It gives you some great visualization tools, allowing you to edit fields, configure the forms, visualize and edit workflows, states, and transitions, and an easy way to open and dig through all the nitty gritty details of everything else that a process template entails too.  As an added bonus, it will give you MUCH better error diagnosis information if something is wrong. So for the previous error, I attempted to open the process template. But this time I got a much more friendly message, pointing me at the issue:

clip_image002[7]

Because I knew that the last thing I changed before my last successful upload of the template was the ProcessTemplate.xml file. I knew exactly where to look and lo and behold, I’d left off a closing bracket at the exact location specified by Visual Studio. So I made the quick fix, successfully imported the updated template to the collection, and checked in the updated template file to SCM. Much better!

clip_image002[11]

There are lots of potential tools and editors out there for process template editing, and everyone develops their own style. I often find myself leveraging several different tools in conjunction during a process template upgrade, it can be a lot of trial and error.  They all have advantages and disadvantages, I’ve tripped over a few myself (like this little quirk with the Team project Manager extension if you’re trying to compare 2008 and 2013 templates). I should blog about some of those adventures too :)

Hopefully this gave you some new options you may not have been aware of before.

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Trying Something new with the ALM User Group in December

by Angela 3. December 2013 13:50

So it’s time again for the annual Christmas Edition of the ALM user group. Normally we do the normal “dinner and a movie” approach, maybe having a special guest speaker or some kind of presentation contest. This month I wanted to do something different.  In December, we’ll be doing an Open Spaces concept. So Open Spaces is sort of an “unconference” thing, where you enter into it with no formal agenda and let the attendees decide what is important and/or interesting to talk about. So think of a topic you’d be willing to lead, or a topic you would like someone else to lead. A few I’d be interested in talking about are transforming organizations to Agile, upgrading legacy systems to TFS 2013, and agile testing.  We will write them on a board, pick some locations for people to gather, and then you vote with your feet, bouncing around if need be.

As an added bonus, if you’ve been attending the ALM user group for a while, you know that December is “Angela cleans out her SWAG closet” month.  So I’ll have lots of fun giveaways including pens, stickers, mouse pads and LOTS of books. I’ll even have special prizes for people who lead an Open Spaces discussion during the meeting (think XBox/Kinect games, Arc mouse, T-Shirts).

So I hope to see you in Downers Grove next week.  I always enjoy our December meetings, and not just because of the cookies :)

Be sure to register soon so I can order the right amount of food!

 

 

Join Us Wednesday, December 11, 2013 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Location:  Microsoft-Downers Grove 3025 Highland Pkwy, Ste 300, Downers Grove

Speaker Bio: You, me, anyone who is interested in speaking!

Agenda:6:30pm dinner 7:00pm Open Spaces Kickoff

RSVP Now to Attend

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These are a few of my favorite things about TFs 2013: Part 2

by Angela 12. November 2013 07:53

So hopefully you already caught part 1 where I extolled the virtues of Work Item Reporting. This time, I have moved into new territory!  I am in the middle of a big, slightly nasty, TFS upgrade and TPC consolidation project.  First thing is first. Attaching a legacy Team Project (TP) to TFS 2013 “upgrades it” but only in the sense that it works on TFS 2013. So you get everything you had before, but not necessarily ALL of the new stuff in 2013.  You probably have very little of the new features in terms of the “agile planning tools”. There were changes made to the underlying TP Process Templates to support new features like, the “Feature” feature :)

I apparently had been taking the TFS Configure Features Wizard (CFW) for granted. “The what?” you say…  Yeah, the thing that gets launched when you upgrade to TFS 2013 and you try to open something like the Product Backlog while connected to a legacy (pre-2012) TP. So if you’ve seen this message, the link at the bottom launches the CFW:

image

Often if you have an older, customized template (like modified CMMI 4.2), you can run into issues with the wizard.  You may be familiar with errors like this “[Error] TF400654: Unable to configure Planning Tools. The following element contains an error: RequirementBacklog” or “[Error] TF400654: Unable to configure Planning Tools. The following element contains an error: TypeFields/TypeField[type='Order']“. Makes sense, there are some HUGE deltas between older templates and those in 2013.

image

So the CFW is super easy to use if you can upgrade with the OOB templates, especially if you’re just upgrading one version behind. And how often does THAT happen in the real world? Right. In our case we have TPs coming from TFS 2005, TFS 2008, AND TFS 2010 and all the templates are customized versions of CMMI. Oy. I decided to begin by upgrading the 2010 TPs since they were the most straight-forward and had the least amount of differences as compared to CMMI 2013. So, that is the main focus of THIS post.  I will share experiences IRT other template versions later.  So if you start with MSDN you’ll see a tangle of different articles when it comes to upgrading to new templates. A few important points about process templates:

  1. A) In case you did not know, you can’t just swap templates out once you have created a Team Project and started using it, you HAVE to upgrade the underlying template of a team project itself to make changes ::opens giant can of worms:: OR if it’s a major change, like going from CMMI to Agile, just trust me on this -- migrate to a new Team Project.
  2. B) Template upgrades can be scripted but at the end of the day it is very manual, and fairly time consuming because of all of the testing required.  XML can be tricky for even the saltiest of us developers.  In the old days it was ALL manual all the time and all command line, but over the years a host of helpful add-ons have become available like the process template editor in the TFS Power Tools, and the TFS Team Project manager tool.
  3. C) Changes to a base process template (so at the TFS Collection level) do not automatically filter down to TPs created with that template, wouldn’t that be awesome and terrible at the same time?!  You must manually apply any template changes to all TPs that used that template, if you want them to remain consistent.  I bet now you really regret spinning up new TPs for every single one-off project your IT group dreamed up huh?

 

But now there is another way, the Configure Features Wizard ::duh duh DUUHHHH:: I will admit, I did not thoroughly RTFM the first time through and missed out on the full power of this little tool myself. To be fair, the last time I had a massive mutli-version TFS consolidation this tool didn’t even exist.  Of course now that I know what to search for, I turned up this AMAZING post of Edwald’s on how the wizard works, as well as this MSDN article that details how it is working its beautiful magic under the covers.  To sum up why it is so awesome, it allows you to specify your template changes once, and then easily rinse and repeat with a click of a button. No scripting or command line necessary. Unless you like that sort of thing, or have a bajillion TPs, then have at it, but use this handy script to iterate through all of your projects.

So how does it work? I still contend there is some black magic involved, but more likely it was a lot of late nights by some wicked smart TFS dudes. Essentially, you need to create a new copy of the legacy template that was used to create the team projects that you wish to upgrade to 2013, and then retrofit some new shinies from both 2012 and 2013 into it. I first downloaded CMMI v5.0 (which they had customized and re-uploaded without renaming – ACK!). Next I had to do things like add in a handful of work item types (Code Review and Feedback for 2012, Features for 2013), update my WIT categories, as well as add the Process Configuration file specific to 2013.  For all other work items I was able to simply replace the 5.0 WIT definitions with the 2013 versions, and then retrofit the client’s customizations back in. I used the heck out of the Team Project Manager Tool to compare them and see exactly what was customized.  Be careful here and read both the 2012 changes AND the 2013 changes that need to be incorporated, so you don’t duplicate effort.  For instance, the 2012 changes have you add 2 configuration files, but then both of those files are replaced by the single Process Configuration file for 2013. When I was done, I had a new version of the process template (with a new name!) that I could use with the wizard to convert the old TFS 2010/CMMI 5.0 TPs to 2013. It also contained all of the customizations that were done on the template before the TPs were created.  Last, I uploaded that bad boy to the TFS Server, navigated to my legacy TPs one-by-one, and launched the Configure Features Wizard. I ignored the recommendation of CMMI 2013, and picked my updated CMMI 5.0 template:

clip_image002

When the wizard runs, the super-simplified explanation is that it performs a DIFF on the team project and the modified process template, and applies the changes to the TP so it now matches the template. I KNOW!! So update the template once, run as many times as you need.

clip_image002[5]

Now, if after the team projects were created off of that old template, you had some template cowboys who went in customized the crap out of team projects in an inconsistent manner, or did not also make that change to the underlying base template as well, you may end up needing to upgrade those team projects by hand and/or resolve any issues encountered during the wizard to upgrade them to 2013 completely. No easy button there. And maybe start being more careful about who you let customize process templates and team projects going forward! ;)

Now you have a simple way to upgrade all of the team projects created off of that old, custom template up to 2013.  At least for 2010.  Next we tackle all of the 2008 TPs.  And my understanding is that if you have 2005 TPs, just play some Taps and migrate what you need to a fresh, new 2013 TP.

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | Power Tools | SDLC | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS 2013 | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Upgrade | Visual Studio 2013 | Work Item Tracking

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Updating TFS 2012 RTM to TFS 2012.3, Always an Adventure

by Angela 8. August 2013 09:27

I often get asked to upgrade clients’ TFS instances to newer versions, apply updates, etc. and I swear it never “just works”.  Well, it did once, and it was a server I had literally JUST upgraded personally to TFS 2012 that no one had touched since Smile with tongue out  My challenges in upgrading TFS instances are rarely due to problems with TFS itself.  99% of the time someone got paranoid about an account having ‘sysadmin’ rights on TFS databases, or Administrator rights on one of the TFS servers, and removed it without telling anyone and suddenly boom!  Of course “boom” doesn’t happen until I am in there maintaining the server or performing an upgrade... So, onto my story about update 3.

It seems every time I get error messages back from the TFS install wizard, they’re not documented (don’t get me started on that rant!), no one else has blogged about it, and no one has asked about it in a forum that I can find.  So I’m posting it myself so the next person to run into this doesn’t waste a lot of time troubleshooting.

So, I was upgrading from TFS 2012.0 to TFS 2012.3.  I upgraded the server from TFS 2010 on SQL 2008 to TFS 2012 on SQL 2012 myself back in January of this year, with just a few minor hiccups. I returned to the client recently to do some customizations to discover they had undone some of the security setup I worked on. :: heavy sigh::  After granting my account all the necessary rights to effectively administer TFS I started working on the upgrade to TFS 2012.3.  About 20 minutes in I encountered this fun little error: “Error: TF400167: Installation failed for the package (patch_KB2815416) with the following status 0x80070643”

clip_image002

So to me there were two places to focus for figuring out the issue.  1) figure out what that KB file was and why it was failing to install, and 2) check out the status 0x80070643 and what causes it.

First I tried simply searching on the error message “TF400167 Installation failed for the package”.  A lot of unrelated posts were returned, and a few potentially helpful ones in Japanese.  Alas I do not speak or read that language.  I did see a lot of references to needing to reboot the server in the posts I COULD read, which I did, to no avail.

Then I tried finding any references to KB2815416 and found exactly one, but alas it was not related to the issue I was having. Grrr.

I dug through the error logs, found the one related to that file (KB2815416), and noticed a host of errors including one saying “TFS 2012 timeout while waiting for worker process” and lots of warnings in the TFS logs about issues with the TFS application pool - [Info   @22:09:26.796] Waiting for worker process for application pool Microsoft Team Foundation Server Message Queue Application Pool to stop.  OK then, Guess I’ll restart the app tier and try to install Update 3 again. Still not working. FRACK!

So now I started focusing on the status being thrown back (0x80070643) and I start finding more helpful posts, though most of them related to much older releases of TFS.  Still, gave it a go.  So I’d already rebooted the server, restarted IIS, but then I noted Vicky’s comment about necessary permissions of the user.  Well, I know the user I am logged in as SHOULD have all of those permissions, because it did back in January when I upgraded to TFS 2012, but we’ve been here before with other clients haven’t we?  BINGO! The TFS admin account I was using had its rights revoked on the SQL Server machine and databases. It was a general TFS Admin account that was shared too, not just Angela-consultant account, so that could have been a big problem for someone. Why, WHY does this happen everywhere I go?!?  So I added the TFS admin account back to the server admin group, and gave it sysadmin on the TFS databases, and finished up the upgrade nicely. Good thing I get paid by the hour, I guess.

The only other things I had to do was rebuild the data warehouse (through the admin console) and rebuild the cube to get reports back up and running.  And even though I manually ran the scheduled backup job after the upgrade successfully, when the exact same job ran overnight it failed with error: “TFS database backup job failed with error: TF30040: The database is not correctly configured. Contact your Team Foundation Server administrator.System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException (0x80131904): Could not find stored procedure 'prc_TfsSetTransactionLogMark'.”

Next step is to recreate the backup job and hope that does the trick.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Upgrade | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio | Visual Studio 2012

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