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Efficient Testing with Microsoft Test Manager – Slides Posted

by Angela 24. October 2013 10:42

I wanted to be sure to share out the slides that were presented at the testing events that I recently spoke at. If you happened to attend one of the events where Chris Kadel presented, he should be posting his slides shortly. Now in case you’re reading this post and thinking “what on earth are you talking about Angela?”, Microsoft recently began a tour of the central US focusing on efficient testing, and even if you did NOT attend, you may find the following information useful so read on…

These events lasted a half day, and covered manual testing and collaboration with MTM, automated testing with Visual Studio, and managing environments and automating the Build-Test-Deploy scenario with TFS Build and Lab Management.  My slides are posted on SlideShare, and the agenda is below.  There are still some events open including St Louis, Kansas City, and Minneapolis MN so you may not have missed it entirely.  Sign up soon because these events have been selling out!

How do I integrate better with the team?
QA is near the end of the process chain, so one of the best things they can do to be successful is improve their efficiency and collaborate better with the development team. In this session, we want to answer all of these questions: What if you could draft and select test cases early in the project and ensure you have test coverage by assigning them to requirements? What if the bugs you discover could automatically include data about the underlying behavior of the application and the machine it’s running on?
Are you getting enough information about a release to know what to test? Which new features have been implemented? Which haven’t? Which bugs are supposedly resolved? We’ll discuss how to take advantage of the opportunities for improving collaboration between testers and developers.
What should I automate?
While manual testing is always going to have its place, there are several types of tests that can be automated for efficiency. In this session, we’ll discuss everything from automating functional and load tests to the automation of writing test case steps and designing for reuse.
How do I set up a dev/test environment?
Today’s applications are more complex than ever and it can be very challenging to set up and maintain these environments. Many organizations resort to a small number of shared environments, but you are trying to keep up with frequent developer builds, concurrent projects, and ever-changing data.
This session introduces Microsoft’s Lab Management solution which allows developers and QA to self-provision their own environments. We’ll look at you can take advantage of virtualization (on-premises or cloud) to create environments, roll them back to known states, and attach them to bugs while minimizing the labor in your data center.

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Free Half Day Events in Oct/Nov: Efficient Testing with Microsoft Test Manager

by Angela 18. September 2013 18:08

Been curious about Microsoft’s latest release of their testing tools? Want to know more about managing your test environments, both on premise and in the cloud? How about when to use test automation and what tools Microsoft has to meet your automation needs?

There is a great half-day testing event coming to a city near you if you live in the Midwest area, wanted to be sure to share it with everyone before it filled up. Since I am delivering the content I can tell you there are going to be some great topics being covered! Best part, it is free. Check out the details and agenda:

How do I integrate better with the team?

QA is near the end of the process chain, so one of the best things they can do to be successful is improve their efficiency and collaborate better with the development team.

In this session, we want to answer all of these questions:

  • What if you could draft and select test cases early in the project and ensure you have test coverage by assigning them to requirements?
  • What if the bugs you discover could automatically include data about the underlying behavior of the application and the machine it’s running on?
  • Are you getting enough information about a release to know what to test?
  • Which new features have been implemented? Which haven’t?
  • Which bugs are supposedly resolved?

We’ll discuss how to take advantage of the opportunities for improving collaboration between testers and developers.

What should I automate?

While manual testing is always going to have its place, there are several types of tests that can be automated for efficiency.

In this session, we’ll discuss everything from automating functional and load tests to the automation of writing test case steps and designing for reuse.

How do I set up a dev/test environment?

Today’s applications are more complex than ever and it can be very challenging to set up and maintain these environments. Many organizations resort to a small number of shared environments, but you are trying to keep up with frequent developer builds, concurrent projects, and ever-changing data.

This session introduces Microsoft’s Lab Management solution which allows developers and QA to self-provision their own environments. We’ll look at you can take advantage of virtualization (on-premises or cloud) to create environments, roll them back to known states, and attach them to bugs while minimizing the labor in your data center.

During this event, your local MTM Specialist will provide you an inside look and show you the capabilities of Microsoft Test Manager. Furthermore, we’ll cover how quality is an accountability and addressable by the entire development organization.

REGISTER NOW at a city near you using one of the links provided:

10/10 Southfield, MI

10/22 Milwaukee, WI

10/23 Chicago, IL

10/24 Indianapolis, IN

10/28 Nashville, TN

10/29 St. Louis, MO

10/30 Kansas City, KS

11/4 Columbus, OH

11/6 Cleveland, OH

11/6 Edina, MN

Event starts promptly at 9am. Complimentary Food & Beverages provided in the morning

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Are You on Windows 8 RTM yet? Get going in under 30 minutes flat!

by Angela 29. August 2012 10:33

So, I have been on the Windows 8 Customer Preview since about February, and I owe that to Eric Boyd who published this kick-ass tutorial with video, to walk you through the process of setting up a Boot to VHD environment for Windows 8.  He really “dumbs it down” which I love. And let’s be clear, I am not dumb, but I am effing LAZY, and if I can accomplish the same end result in fewer, simpler steps, SIGN ME UP!

Since I do a lot of client work, I didn’t want to completely scrap my current Windows 7 setup with all of my Visual Studio/MTM/TFS 2010 tools.  At the same time, I really want to be using Windows 8 with Visual Studio/MTM/TFS 2012, without giving up access to my 8-core processor and 16GB of RAM.  I know, I am a lucky girl Smile  So, having a dual boot option with Win 8 running darn near native was the perfect setup for me.  I can choose to boot to either Win 7 + VS 2010 or Win 8 + VS 2012. I know, VS 2010 can live side by side with 2012 but I had encountered issues in the past with them fighting each other, and would rather not mess with it.  Plus if I ever need to pave Windows 8 again, it’ll take me all of 30 minutes to do it, obviously, or I wouldn’t be writing this post. 

Here is where it gets really awesome. There wasn’t much to the update.  I literally went to the drive that housed my old Win8.vhd and deleted it. Now, be sure you’ve backed everything up, unless like me you are using some kind of wonderful back-up tool like SkyDrive or DropBox.  Just be sure to disconnect the image from your backup software before blowing it away so you don’t accidentally tell it to clear your stored data!

Back to my point. I simply went to my c:\VHD folder, deleted the Win8.vhd file, and then went back through Eric’s tutorial using the latest Windows 8 iso. Easy as pie! 

Just to recap, this was literally all I had to do:

  1. Download the Win 8 iso from MSDN and write down my product key
  2. Then according to Eric’s instructions perform the following commands (your drive letters may vary):
    • create vdisk file=C:\VHD\Boot\Win8\Win8.vhd maximum=60000 type=expandable
    • select vdisk file=C:\VHD\Boot\Win8\Win8.vhd
    • attach vdisk
    • create partition primary
    • assign letter=V
    • imagex /info G:\sources\install.wim  <—only difference is a second options 1 = professional, 2 = core. So most of you will still pick “1”
    • imagex /apply G:\sources\install.wim 1 V:\
    • bcdboot V:\Windows 
  3. Boot and enjoy!  

Like I said, about 35 minutes door-to-door to get the VHD configured and ready. Applying the Win 8 iso was literally the longest running step in the entire process (24 minutes for me), but alas we cannot speed that up. Once you boot into your Win 8 VHD, there will be some more setup, especially if your past experience was with the Preview. Here is a run-down of what to expect here:

  1. Choose the Win 8 Options from the boot menu
  2. You’ll see a message about “Getting devices ready”, this may take a few minutes
  3. “Getting Ready” message appears
  4. I was then prompted again to select my OS (I left the room so it must have rebooted as part of setup)
  5. Then enter your product key and accept terms
  6. Choose some personalization options (colors, wireless router to connect to, express settings, etc.)
  7. Sign into your account
  8. Win 8 installs some base apps, gives you a little color rotator show while things happen, applies some final settings and off you go!
  9. Don’t forget to download SkyDrive to re-sync all your stuff, and turn on the HyperV feature!

Ahhhhhhhhhhhh…

WP_001022

Tags:

Windows 8 | SkyDrive | Hyper-V

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