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Join Polaris for a TFS Release Management Webinar in February

by Angela 22. January 2015 16:29

So in case you have not heard, the licensing for Release management just got CRAZY inexpensive, if you have MSDN anyway. More about licensing can be found on MSDN.

Wondering what Release Management is? Well I don’t want to steal Zaneta’s thunder, so I’ll sum it up. Imagine a TFS extension that allowed you to easily deploy an application across a host of environments, including approval workflows for release to each environment, with the click of a button. If you’re an agile shop looking to achieve continuous deployment across a number of environments, this is a must have! 

Join us in February to learn more from one of our RM experts! Register Now

Continuous Delivery with Release Management

DevOps is an increasingly important part of application lifecycle management and is a growing area of interest as businesses need to develop and deploy quality applications at a faster pace. Release Management for Visual Studio is a continuous delivery solution that automates the release process through various environments all the way to production.

With Release Management in Visual Studio you can configure, approve and deploy your applications for any environment. Create automated deployment orchestrations for each environment no matter how complex the configuration. Delivering your software more frequently and easily to an environment allows your testers to get to work validating your system and keeps your stakeholders involved in giving feedback.

Please join us for this free online webinar to learn more about this powerful ALM toolset.

Key Experiences:

· Overview of Release Management

· Installation and Setup

· TFS integration

· Approval workflows overview

· Release Template creation

· Authoring and maintaining releases

 

Event Info: Thursday, February 12,2015 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM CDT

Presenter: Żaneta Surdel has been developing software for the last 10 years. She has worked on a variety of projects utilizing various Microsoft technologies and filled a number of roles – programmer, (human) release manager, ALM consultant. She holds a MCSD ALM certification and is a certified Scrum Master. For the last 4 years, she’s been a Senior Consultant with Polaris Solutions.

Register Now

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Free Azure Dev Bootcamp in Chicago next Monday

by Angela 16. January 2015 09:02

Sorry this is so last minute but I just discovered this myself!

Been interested in kicking the tires on Azure? I got a sneak peek at this one when Dan Gartner was delivering it, and it’s not a bunch of marketing fluff and power point, you get your hands DIRTY.  Did I mention it’s free? Sign up now before it fills up! https://msevents.microsoft.com/cui/EventDetail.aspx?culture=en-US&EventID=1032611219

Master the new Microsoft Azure features and services to build, deploy and move apps to the cloud

Roll up your sleeves and get ready to master the latest Microsoft Azure development tools and technologies. Join us at an expert-led Microsoft Cloud DevCamp and leave with code running in the cloud! DevCamps are fun, FREE events for developers, by developers. That means no fluff or filler – just valuable coding skills you can immediately put into action.

What will I learn?

With lively demos and hands-on labs, you’ll see how to use the new Microsoft Azure features and services (such as Microsoft Azure Virtual Machines, Websites, and Visual Studio 2013) to build and move apps to the cloud – including websites, enterprise-class applications, and mobile apps. We'll also give away a $100 Microsoft Store gift card to one lucky attendee at each event!

What is Cloud DevCamp?

Good question! Jump-start your knowledge of Microsoft Azure development or learn what’s new with the latest Microsoft Azure features and services. Either way, we’ll start with the basics and build up to more advanced topics – and developers of all languages are welcome. With Microsoft Azure, you can use almost any framework, language or tool to create or move existing applications to the cloud.

Instructor-led, hands-on labs will focus on:

 

• Microsoft Azure Websites and Virtual Machines using ASP.NET & Microsoft SQL Server

• Deploying Cloud Services in Microsoft Azure

• Exploring Microsoft Azure Storage for Microsoft Visual Studio 2013

Fees

This FREE event is brought to you by your local Microsoft office. Delegates are responsible for booking and funding their own travel and accommodations, as required.

 

Note – you MUST bring a laptop to participate in this event. In addition:

· Activate a free 30-day trial Azure account here

· If you subscribe to MSDN, activate your free Azure MSDN subscriber benefits here

· Download the free Cloud DevCamps Training Kit here. Save time at your event by completing the download now.

· Have Visual Studio 2013 installed

You will also need to bring:

· Computer power supply

· Notebook & pen

· Identification

· Your own wireless Internet hotspot (if you have one), just in case Internet connectivity is limited.

Tags:

.NET | ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Azure | Cloud Computing | Deployment

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Chicago ALM User Group - Christmas 2014 Edition with Doc Norton

by Angela 5. December 2014 16:44

Join us on Wednesday, December 17, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM for this very special event!

December is always a special meeting for us!  We will have great food, lots of great giveaways, and I'm excited to say that we have an amazing speaker flying in from California for this event - Doc Norton.  You may already follow him on Twitter, read his blog, or maybe you have seen him speaking at one of many conferences.  If not, I highly recommend checking out his blog, and then be sure to sign up for our December event so you can hear him in person.

In December, Doc will be tackling effective metrics.Velocity is one of the most common metrics used-and one of the most commonly misused-on agile projects. Velocity is simply a measurement of speed in a given direction-the rate at which a team is delivering toward a product release. As with a vehicle en route to a particular destination, increasing the speed may appear to ensure a timely arrival. However, that assumption is dangerous because it ignores the risks with higher speeds. And while it’s easy to increase a vehicle’s speed, where exactly is the accelerator on a software team? Michael “Doc" Norton walks us through the Hawthorne Effect and Goodhart’s Law to explain why setting goals for velocity can actually hurt a project's chances. Take a look at what can negatively impact velocity, ways to stabilize fluctuating velocity, and methods to improve velocity without the risks. Leave with a toolkit of additional metrics that, coupled with velocity, give a better view of the project's overall health.

Speaker Bio: Doc is Global Director of Engineering Culture at Groupon. Once a dedicated code slinger, Doc has turned his energy toward helping teams, departments, and companies work better together in the pursuit of better software. An agile practitioner and coach since 1999, Doc's 20-plus years of software development experience have provided him with exposure to a wide range of topics. Doc declares expertise in no single language or methodology and is immediately suspicious of anyone who declares such expertise. A frequent speaker, Doc is passionate about helping others become better developers, working with teams to improve delivery, and building great organizations.

Location:Microsoft-Chicago 200 East Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Register here: http://chicagoalmug.org/

As always, please be sure to register soon so I can order the right amount of food and so that the security folks will let you in! You can park in the Aon center for a discounted rate after 6pm, but your best bet may be SpotHero if you choose to drive. I’ve seen $8 parking ½ block away using their service.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Agile | development | SDLC | Culture | Metrics

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Demystifying TFS 2013 .3 Access Levels and Licensing, a bit

by Angela 7. October 2014 09:58

In case you’re wondering, yes I specifically included the TFS update number because the licensing for TFS changes so often these days, that you really do have to be know what version of TFS someone is talking about to be sure you’re telling them the right thing. Anyway, I work with a lot of customers who get really confused about TFS Access Levels, in terms of what they mean and how you know who belongs in each “bucket”. You may even be thinking “what are access levels?” depending on what version of TFS you are running today.  Access levels were introduced with the release of TFS 2012, to ensure that users of the TFS web tools were only accessing the features they paid for.  You can find the access levels administration page in your TFS admin console, at the TFS instance level (so make sure you are in the Control Panel and not at a lower level, like at the Collection or Team project levels).

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You may have noticed (default) in the Full Access level row, this means that if you do not EXPLICITLY assign anyone to an access level, they will get Full access by default.  Not a big deal on my personal TFS instance because I have Visual Studio Ultimate and am the only user.  On your own instance however, best to leave the default at Limited, and add Active Directory groups to each Access Level to give your TFS users the right level of functionality, based on their licensing. Otherwise you risk unintentionally giving people access to features they have not paid for, being out of compliance with Microsoft, and having very unhappy users when you later have to fix things and end up taking away your TFS user’s features because they haven’t paid for them. There unfortunately isn’t obvious documentation on how this works for TFS 2013 so you may not have even realized that’s what was happening, but I did find reference to it in the TFS 2012 docs.

Now your next question is probably “What features does each access level give you?”

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  1. 3) With Limited access, users can create and modify only those work items that the user creates and can query on their own work items only.

  2. 5) Read-only.

This list only applies to on-premise TFS, access to web features on VSOnline are slightly different these days, and access is controlled by your license level automatically since you have to sign in with your MSDN account or Live ID. Note the major differences between each level, since this may even influence what license you decide to buy for your users. Most people fall under at least Standard access, but your QA, developer, and support teams often require a Full license for Web-based test management and the feedback tools. If you’re not familiar with them, definitely look up some videos and watch them in action, or reach out to me for a quick demo! :)

OK, so now you understand where to set access levels, and how they control what a user has access to on the web. How does each access level map to a license? This is pretty simple actually.

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You may be wondering, “well what about Visual Studio Professional?”.  Yeah, not sure why they left that one out, but since VS Pro includes a CAL, those users would get Standard access. Note that this means that VS Pro users do NOT get access to some really cool features listed above.

Now what about security? It’s very possible that your Active Directory groups are currently mapped to a user’s role, and does not necessarily coincide with access levels.  Particularly if your developer group has a mix of VS Pro, Premium, and Ultimate.  Now you cannot just assign your TFS_Developers group (or whatever you call it) to one access level, since some fall under Standard and some fall under Full. My advice is to create 3 Active Directory groups that map to your 3 access levels and chuck people into those AD groups as you buy or renew your licenses with Microsoft.  Technically, you could set one Access level as the default, not create an AD group for it, and anyone “unassigned” to an access level gets the default. I avoid that because it assumes too much, and that is how users fall through the cracks.  Just create Active Directory groups for each level, assign that AD group to the corresponding level, and whenever you add new TFS users they get added to that access level AD group to allow them access to the right TFS web features.

Limited access level, Add Windows user or group

 

Hopefully this shed some light on how Access levels work, and does not further confuse you. TFS licensing is rather complex, but sitting down and planning out your security and access model, and leveraging Active Directory as much as possible can make this really simple to administer in the long run. You can also find out more about licensing from the Visual Studio and MSDN Licensing White Paper, it’s honestly a blog series in and of itself, and again it is so complex and changes often enough that I’m not even going to try to untangle it just yet.

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It’s almost Fall, and that means more Conferences

by Angela 6. October 2014 09:39

So conference season is kicking in full force again, and I already have quite a few on my radar, though sadly I doubt I can attend them all.  Here are a few worth taking note of, and some are coming up FAST so be sure to register if you’re at all interested because you may lose out!

 

DevOps Days Chicago (10/7 and 10/8): I am particularly bummed that I cannot make it to this one.  Not just because it is organized by my friend Matt Stratton of Arrested DevOps, but because it’s guaranteed to be chock full of topics relevant to ANYONE in the software biz.

DevOpsDays is a community-driven technical conference that focuses on bridging the gap between development and operations. The first DevOpsDays took place in Ghent five years ago, and there have been over forty events worldwide since then. Now, it is finally coming to Chicago.  DevOpsDays provides a collaborative environment where people can interact with their peers, learn about tools and automation, and discuss best practices. The topics covered are relevant for developers, system administrators, infosec engineers, QA engineers, product managers, technical managers, and anyone else responsible for delivering software.

This 2 day event is only $149. You can even receive a 10% discount on registration by using the promo code DEVOPSMATT when registering: http://devopsdays.org/events/2014-chicago/registration/

Also, seriously listen to Arrested DevOps, it’s a great podcast.

 

St Louis Day of .NET (11/13 through 11/15): Just a 5 hour drive (or Amtrak ride) away is this fantastic conference.  I attended, ran a booth, and spoke at this event last year.  There are over 140 sessions with a full day of “pre-compiler” sessions where you can get your hands dirty for a very small additional cost. It’s currently still in early bird pricing, so just $200 for the conference, and $84 for a full had precompiler session. If you register after October 13th the price jumps to $300, and it’s $600 at the door.  So register quick!

They have top quality speakers, a great conference space, a full roster of local tech sponsors (like Polaris Solutions of course!) fun events to network (and just have fun), and is a really good value given how little it costs to attend.  Also, the hotel is pretty swank too, so bring the family if you want to just spend the weekend there :)

 

Agile Day Chicago 2014 – (October 9th) This as a new one (to me anyway) and seems really promising.  For just $99 I get an entire day of learning, collaborating, and sharing ideas with other agile practitioners in the Chicagoland area. The theme this year: Product Driven Learning - Listening, Learning, and Doing. 

  • Learning - Learn patterns and ideas that are currently being done for product learning
  • Listening - New ideas for product learning
  • Doing - An all interactive track where you will be doing things hands on

Sessions will speak to various topics like product design, leadership, technology and development practices all with a focus on outcomes.

More information can be found here - http://devjam.com/2014/07/31/agile-day-chicago-2014/

 

I’m also super stoked to be attending the Microsoft MVP Summit again! But this one is just for Microsoft MVPs. Hope to see you there if you;re an MVP!  And if you’re not an MVP yet, chat with me some time about the benefits, and what kinds of activities qualify you for MVP, it’s an amazing program to be a part of :)

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Something a little Different for the Chicago ALM User Group in October

by Angela 17. September 2014 15:54

So you may have noticed that the Chicago ALM User Group has been a little quiet this summer. Summer is always a tad slow and everyone would rather be out enjoying some time with the family, or maybe by heading up to the Wisconsin Dells for ThatConference like I did :)  Well, summer break is over and the Chicago ALM user group is back! We’ll be meeting in early October for something a little different.

I recently started working with a local firm who has come a long way in their quest for agility and a healthy corporate culture. They've accomplished some amazing positive changes in their use of ALM tooling, in their software delivery process, and most importantly in their corporate culture. Join us in October to hear their story, and maybe pick up some tips on how to make similar changes within your own teams.

Story-telling and panel discussion: Ever wonder how agile is supposed to work in real life, like how it’s described in the books? We did too and tried it out. We want tell our story, “There and Back Again”, a development team’s tale of how we are becoming agile including the thrills of victory and agonies of defeat, then open it up for a panel discussion.

Speaker Bios:

Daniel Porrey has 24 years’ experience in the IT industry with a range of skills from networking and hardware to software development. He has worked for several international based organizations striving to achieve high efficiency while driving the greatest levels of business value. Having been "classically" trained in IT as an Engineer, he has successfully completed numerous large scale projects under the waterfall methodology. With the need to gain even higher performance from his teams, the desire to hire and retain high performance talent, and the ability to deliver more automation, he converted his group to agile over the past several years with great success. In all endeavors, his primary focus has been on the quality of the delivered product.

Anthony Perkins has been part of developing software almost two decades. He has experienced being developer, software architect, and now manages a .Net application team. After working in the waterfall environment most of his career, Anthony is in the midst of transitioning to agile methodologies. Driving for continuous improvement, he looks for ways to improve the delivery of high quality software and overall development process.

Raja Tirumala Rao Guna  has over 9 years of software development experience in Microsoft.Net technologies.   He worked in different roles starting as developer and moving up the path as Dev lead, Tech Lead and Architect, though always a developer at heart.  For the past 2 years he been working on agile projects and using TFS to help on board his teams with Agile engineering practices.

Chris Steele has more than 14 years of professional software experience, and has been working with agile for over 9 years, with a heavy focus on Scrum. Working independently, with consulting agencies, or internally, in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia has provided him with a wide range of experiences and a keen insight into the common problems and solutions that companies find when embracing agile, as well as how to present and sell it to clients ranging from the smallest to global enterprises. Having worked as a development team member, a ScrumMaster, a Product Owner, a resource manager, and an agile coach, in a variety of settings, Chris has had the opportunity to directly experience the day-to-day pulls and stresses inherent in each role, and in almost every organization type imaginable. Passionate about organizational change, and the benefits of agility, Chris also has experience as a speaker both locally and internationally.

 

Register now to secure a seat! http://chicagoalmug.org/

Tags:

Agile | ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Collaboration | Microsoft | Process Methodology | Productivity | SDLC | Scrum | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2013 | TFS | Visual Studio 2013 | VS 2013 | development

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Referencing and Copying Test Cases in MTM 2013, a Lesson in Patience

by Angela 22. August 2014 15:49

Recently, I’ve had some lengthy discussions about test case, suite, and plan copying in Microsoft Test Manager (MTM), and it something that a lot of people are struggling with. In some cases, people are not even aware that you can do all of these things, let alone the subtle differences around what they are doing behind the scenes. Either way, hope this sheds some light on another way that MTM helps you to manage your testing efforts. There are a handful of methods for reusing test cases across multiple test suites and plans.

1) Add existing test cases – also known as re-using a test case by referencing it. So, in MTM, test cases are by default REFERENCED when you add them to test plans/suites.  You do this through the Add button in the Plan tab of MTM.

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The implication for using Add is that you need the EXACT SAME test case in multiple places, and if the test case changes it needs to change everywhere. So if I add a test case to 3 different test suites, any change to the test case is reflected in all 3 places automatically. Think of the test case instances that you see in the suites as pointers back to the original test case. Handy! Or annoying depending on your test versioning strategy. As an added bonus, with Add you can pull in test cases from any test plan in the team project collection by simply removing the @Project clause on the query!

image

 

2) Create test suites by referencing existing test cases performs a shallow copy of test suites from a different test plan within the current team project, allowing you to easily reference its test cases. There are 2 places where you will find this option, in the context menu of the Test Plan, as well as in the MTM menu bar of the Plan | Contents tab.

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In MTM 2010, this option was called “Copy test suites from another plan” , which to most reasonable folks sounded like it copied everything. But it was not really a full copy of everything, it was actually a brand new test suite based on the original suite, and the suite contains REFERENCES back to the original test cases. As you can see, in MTM 2013, the menu option is now more explicit about what it is doing. The brand new suite has a new ID and the same name as the original test suite, it also includes all of the original test cases but is just referencing the test cases and their associated requirements. Changing the new test suite does not affect the original suite, but remember that changing the test cases in the new test suite would change the test cases in the original test suite. Also, note that this can only happen across different test plans in the same Team Project, so you cannot use this feature to duplicate test suites into the test plan you are currently in, or to duplicate test suites across Team Project boundaries. Maybe that is an edge case, but people have asked me if they could do it.

But what about the cases where you really do need to effectively BRANCH those test cases?  Say you have a new version of some functionality, but you still need to support the original functionality, and so you need to have two slightly different versions of the same test case. Well, you have yet another option – Copy. Technically you have a few more options yet.

3) Create copy and add to suite is a shallow clone operation on just a single test case. Accessible in the MTM client, you just right click on any test case, and use this tool to create a new copy of the test case, and save it into the test suite that you are currently in. All links, comments, steps, parameters (shared and otherwise), and properties are carried over - but new versions of all of these related items were not created. The new test case refers back to the same links, parameters, etc. of the original test case, and even links back to the original test case so you can see how it originated. Test run results associated to the test case are NOT copied over. Attachments are NOT copied in this case either. And again the scope is the current Team project, current test plan, and current test suite. I cannot cross Team project, test plan, or test suite boundaries with this command.

image

But we’re not done!

4) You might have noticed a Copy (CTRL + C) option in that context menu in the MTM desktop client as well. Don’t be fooled, this just creates another reference to the original test case wherever you paste.  So while it is similar to using the Add button, I can only Copy a test case using this command into another test suite within the same test plan. In other words, it does not work across Team Project or Test Plan boundaries, but it MUST be used across test suite boundaries. And in this case, Copy actually means reference, instead of you know, copy. I know, really? OK, one more option to cover in this blog post.

5) Create a copy of this work item (including links) is the Copy option available only on the web, and it is slightly different than the options available in the desktop version of MTM. This appears to just be the standard Copy Work Item context menu option that you can access anywhere on the web, and nothing specific to the test tools. Clear as mud, right?

Honestly, I’m also having a hard time understanding how it is SUPPOSED to work because it has some odd behavior in my opinion (on VSOnline anyway). It allows you to specify a “Project” in the creation dialog, which I assume means TEAM PROJECT, like it does when you are creating copies of any other work item type from the web. The new test case work item is created in the specified project, with the same references as the original work item, but also adds it to the existing test suite in the current project. I assumed it would only create the new test case in the team project specified. Apparently not. So it does the same type of copy that Create copy and add to suite does, but allows you to do it across team project boundaries. image

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Frustrated yet? I know I am and I’ve been using these tools for years. It’s a lot to keep straight, and even I sometimes forget which options bring over which links and artifacts so I have to refer back to the handy tables available on MSDN.  Definitely talk to your team and decide which options to use and when.

Oh, yeah, and cloning is also an option now, but that is another larger discussion so stay tuned for another blog post on that one.

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Strengthening Your Team Through Vulnerability

by Angela 10. July 2014 11:56

This is actually a cross-post from my company’s blog… but likely you don’t go to that one very often and I didn’t want this post to be overlooked.

I go through phases where I devour books, usually when I am attending industry conferences where speakers are recommending books that have elicited “AHA!” moment for them. In many cases, it’s the same handful of books being quoted repeatedly. These 3 books in particular have been coming up a lot, and they inspired me to rethink how I work, and live:

1) Drive (which I am actually reading right now for a second time)

2) Five Dysfunctions of a Team

3) Getting Naked.

The first is a psychological study into what motivates people (hint:it’s NOT actually money in most cases). The last 2 are actually “business fables”, a genre that I hadn’t realized existed before now, and that I really enjoy. I am noticing a few themes common to all 3 of these books, that can have a tremendous positive impact on organizations. Yet in my experience, these themes rarely come up when management is discussing strategy for change, whether it be organization-wide or focused on a particular group. No matter how well thought out your processes and procedures are, or how “best of breed” your new expensive tooling is, one thing will always lay waste to even the best laid plans, is culture. Now, addressing corporate culture is nothing I can sum up in a single blog post, but one aspect of it in particular calls out to me as needing urgent attention. FEAR.

I am not suggesting the use of fear to control your team, quite the contrary. I am suggesting that to strengthen your team, you need to expose your fears, more specifically you need to show each other vulnerability. Does that sound a little odd to you? Are you thinking “how can I be a strong leader or teammate if I am showing fear, or appearing vulnerable to my team?” It seems a bit counterintuitive.

Many of the issues that prevent people from breaking old habits, from really making a difference, from moving forward, is guardedness. I see this not only on teams I have worked with professionally, but in myself in my daily life. I suspect many of us keep our guard up by default. We protect our calendars, our intellectual property, our reputations. But this often means we are effectively operating as a team of 1, and there is no real sense of understanding or trust between team members or between the team and its leadership. Adding to that, if there is an implied stigma (or explicit punishment) for saying “I don’t know” or “I made a mistake”, more focus and energy will be spent by people on protecting themselves, rather than on learning from their mistakes and improving.

For the team, it means admitting when they need to do some research before taking on a new project, admitting they need more time when their forecasts were off because they did not understand the full scope of a problem, or admitting when they have hit a wall and need some help to make progress. For management it means admitting your own mistakes to your own managers as well as to your team, trusting your team to do the right thing, and accepting mistakes as an opportunity for growth. If all of that seems overwhelming, start by sharing your stories with one another - a few basic facts like your least and most favorite subjects in school, your hobbies, the last movie you saw.  The simple act of sharing a few bits of personal back story with one another can really open people up, inspire a base level of trust, and even uncover common threads that bring a team closer together. It might seem trite, or overly simplistic, but you’d be surprised how differently you view your teammates when you find out they coach little league 3 nights a week where your kids play, or that someone else has also dreamed of being a concert pianist all of their life. Give it a try…

Until we all learn to be open, honest, and vulnerable with the people we work with, it will be extremely difficult to ever build up the level of trust necessary to truly improve and grow, both as individuals and as a team. And seriously, go to Amazon and pick up those 3 books right now.  It may just be the best $40 you’ve spent in a while.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Collaboration | personal growth | Productivity | SDLC

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Join The Chicago ALM User Group on Wednesday July 23 to Talk About Octopus Deploy

by Angela 29. June 2014 19:11

So in case you’re wondering, yes this is a repeat of the May user group meeting where we discussed Octopus Deploy as an alternative to Release Management. It was a really great and interactive discussion, so we’re repeating it on the downtown location. We heard a lot of great tips and tricks based on a real-life and rather huge deployment of Octopus. So down to business…

Are you using automated deployment tools yet? No? Why the heck not?! Regain your sanity and confidence with consistent and reliable automated deployments using Octopus Deploy. Octopus works with your build server to deploy ASP.NET applications and Windows Services into test, staging and production environments, whether they are in the cloud or on-premises.

I hope to see you in Chicago at the Aon Center for this one. Please be sure to register soon so I can order the right amount of food and so that the security folks will let you in!

Speaker Bio: Ian is an ASP.NET MVC C# programmer with Avanade. A nocturnal programmer by nature, he’s often working on his own .NET projects in the twilight hours.  He’s often advocating Octopus Deploy. For more information on Octopus Deploy and other related ramblings, you can visit his blog at http://ianpaullin.com or twitter feed at @ianpaullin.

Location:Microsoft-Chicago 200 East Randolph, 2nd floor, Chicago IL

Agenda:6:30pm dinner 7:00pm Presentation

RSVP Now to Attend

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | Deployment Planning | Deployment | DevOps | SDLC | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS 2013 | Visual Studio 2013 | VS 2013 | Visual Studio

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June 25th: TFS 2013 and Git (Dogs and cats, living together... mass hysteria!)

by Angela 10. June 2014 18:07

So you’ve probably heard of Git. a free and open source distributed version control system that is really popular with development teams of all shapes and sizes these days. Problem is, that’s pretty much all it does, so if you need tools for managing work items, performing builds, deploying apps to environments, producing reports, then you’re going to be taping together about 10 different systems to make that happen.  TFS 2013 does all of those things, but maybe you still want DVCS too. Well, now you can have it all!

Join the Chicago ALM user group on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM to learn more.

Description: One of the most notable feature additions in Team Foundation Server 2013 is the ability to use Git for version control. Now your team has a choice between centralized version control and distributed version control since Git is now a first class citizen in the Team Foundation Server family. Join Dave Burnison at the June Chicago ALM user group meeting as Dave walks through the Git integration in Team Foundation Server. You'll see how you can use Git for source control and still provide traceability between source code commits, bug fixes, etc. We will see how TFS and Visual Studio provide an intuitive UI for many of the Git commands, but still allow you to use Git from the command line if that is how you prefer to deal with some of the more advanced commands. Will look at other TFS/Git integration points such as the integration with the TFS Build system allowing you to provide continuous integration builds for your team.

Speaker: Dave Burnison is a Senior ALM Consultant for InCycle Software which is a Microsoft ALM Gold Competency partner. He supports customers and the ALM community by providing guidance and best practices for Application Lifecycle Management. When Dave is not working, he enjoys spending time with his family and friends, being involved in his church and following the NFL and NASCAR. Dave is very passionate about ALM and the Software Development Life Cycle. He has worked in the software development industry his entire career. Having worked for both startups and large companies, his strength is his view and knowledge of the overall software development lifecycle paired with technical skills which allow him to create and manage ALM systems, processes and procedures that enable software development teams to become as efficient and productive as possible.

Agenda:6:30pm dinner 7:00pm Presentation

Location: Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

RSVP Now to Attend

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | git | Open Source | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2013 | TFS | Visual Studio 2013 | Visual Studio | VS 2013

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