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Visual Studio 2013 Launch Event Coming to Chicago

by Angela 4. November 2013 15:18

So in case you’ve been living under a rock for the past few weeks, Microsoft released a new version of its Visual Studio ALM Tools including Team Foundation Server, Microsoft Test Manager, and Visual Studio. I know! Feels like 2012 just launched doesn’t it? With their new release cadence, if you blink you could miss a new version, or at least a few updates. It’s pretty amazing actually.

While there is an official BIG launch party happening on November 13th in NYC, you can also logon for the virtual launch that day if you can’t get away to the Big Apple on such short notice.  Although right now you don’t appear to be able to actually register for the virtual launch – DOH!  For now you can at least add it to your calendar, hopefully they will fix that soon.

I also just heard that there are also some smaller in-person launch events around the U.S, possibly hitting a city near you.  Sadly I will miss the Chicago launch event on November 20th, I’ll be at the MVP summit in Bellevue Washington. Not a bad trade-off though ;)  But if you’re in town, check out the Chicago event details and register quick before it fills up! And check back with the events site often because more cities will be opening up soon.

Agenda

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Location

Drury Lane Convention Center

100 Drury Ln
Oakbrook Terrace Illinois 60181
United States

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Some events are not listed on the events site yet, so here are some other cities coming on-line and a link to get registered:

12/3

Boston, MA

12/3

Nashville, TN

12/3

Bellevue, WA

12/4

Washington, DC

12/4

Philadelphia, PA

12/4

Miami, FL

12/5

Phoenix, AZ

12/10

Atlanta, GA

12/10

Denver, CO

12/11

Concord, CA

12/11

Harrisburg, PA

12/12

Sandy, UT

1/15

Los Angeles, CA

1/21

Mountain View, CA

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Efficient Testing with Microsoft Test Manager – Slides Posted

by Angela 24. October 2013 10:42

I wanted to be sure to share out the slides that were presented at the testing events that I recently spoke at. If you happened to attend one of the events where Chris Kadel presented, he should be posting his slides shortly. Now in case you’re reading this post and thinking “what on earth are you talking about Angela?”, Microsoft recently began a tour of the central US focusing on efficient testing, and even if you did NOT attend, you may find the following information useful so read on…

These events lasted a half day, and covered manual testing and collaboration with MTM, automated testing with Visual Studio, and managing environments and automating the Build-Test-Deploy scenario with TFS Build and Lab Management.  My slides are posted on SlideShare, and the agenda is below.  There are still some events open including St Louis, Kansas City, and Minneapolis MN so you may not have missed it entirely.  Sign up soon because these events have been selling out!

How do I integrate better with the team?
QA is near the end of the process chain, so one of the best things they can do to be successful is improve their efficiency and collaborate better with the development team. In this session, we want to answer all of these questions: What if you could draft and select test cases early in the project and ensure you have test coverage by assigning them to requirements? What if the bugs you discover could automatically include data about the underlying behavior of the application and the machine it’s running on?
Are you getting enough information about a release to know what to test? Which new features have been implemented? Which haven’t? Which bugs are supposedly resolved? We’ll discuss how to take advantage of the opportunities for improving collaboration between testers and developers.
What should I automate?
While manual testing is always going to have its place, there are several types of tests that can be automated for efficiency. In this session, we’ll discuss everything from automating functional and load tests to the automation of writing test case steps and designing for reuse.
How do I set up a dev/test environment?
Today’s applications are more complex than ever and it can be very challenging to set up and maintain these environments. Many organizations resort to a small number of shared environments, but you are trying to keep up with frequent developer builds, concurrent projects, and ever-changing data.
This session introduces Microsoft’s Lab Management solution which allows developers and QA to self-provision their own environments. We’ll look at you can take advantage of virtualization (on-premises or cloud) to create environments, roll them back to known states, and attach them to bugs while minimizing the labor in your data center.

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These are a few of my favorite things, about TFS 2013 (Part 1)

by Angela 18. October 2013 13:31

Are you picturing a redhead dancing around a large bedroom singing about string and warm woolen mittens?

Yeah, it’s kinda like that. Only I’m no Julie Andrews, I don’t actually have a very good singing voice, and our house is not nearly that fancy :)  Also, instead of brown paper packages I am singing the praises of the MTM Test Hub, Work Item Charting, and awesome things like that.

As you’ve probably heard TFS 2013 released yesterday. A full day ahead of time, I know!  And like any passionate ALM consultant I’ve been using TFS 2013 for some time now. If you’re taking advantage of TFS Service, you have been too whether you knew it or not. So on to my first favorite thing about TFS 2013. Work item charting. The concept of work item charting is a pretty simple one, and frankly one customers have been clamoring for since TFS 2005. Business users do not want to have to learn SSRS to get quick, custom views that they can use to analyze work items.  And frankly, while Excel ad-hoc reporting is much easier than SSRS, it’s still not an “EASY button” solution for simple work item based charting/reporting. Thanks Staples for giving me that reference. 

So let’s divine in a bit shall we?  We will be working with one of my pet projects, a Scavenger Hunt application for the phone (if someone creates one soon, I’ll know where you got the idea now!) Assume we have some simple queries, for instance one which pulls back ALL tasks in a team project. This could be a lot to take in analyze, especially on large, established projects with multiple teams. So, below we have work items, tasks, bugs, etc.  All assigned to various people, planned for different sprints, and so on and so forth. 

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But what if I wanted a quick visualization of work item types, or work assigned to various team members across the entire project? Not a super easy way to do that in any of the previously available reporting methods.  Here is where Work Item Charting comes in.  You might notice a new menu item called “Charts” (circled above) in the web tools for TFS 2013.  When you switch your view to Charts it will show you any existing charts for that query, as well as the ability to create new charts.  So in my case, I already had a chart out there which breaks down all work items by type. Marginally useful, but maybe another chart TYPE would actually be a better way to visualize the data.  So the first thing I want to do is try different chart types, and see if something else strikes my fancy:

image

I *love* that as you make choices in the edit box, it automatically gives you a preview of the resulting report. That will save SO many clicks.  So I changed the chart type to a stacked bar, changed the sort and saved the report.

image

A bit more useful, but I’d like another view available, this time including assignment data.  But I’ll need to make some changes to my query, because if I try to simply show this in a new chart with the existing data, you’ll notice I do not even have an option to group by assigned to:

image

Think of the query as your chart data source, meaning all rows returned will be displayed, and even more importantly, only the fields returned by the query will be available as well.  So if my query returns work item type, title, and state then those are the only fields that I can report on. AND only fields with a reportable type of “dimension” can be used for grouping. These little nuggets often trip people up, they assume all of the fields for the returned rows are available and available for grouping/sorting. So I need to go back to my original query, and add the assigned to field to add that data to my chart:

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Now when I go back into my charts, I have another field that I can use for pivoting my data!

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Well, I could certainly spend FAR more time on this topic, but I just wanted to give you a little taste of one of my favorite features of TFS 2013 – Work Item Charting.  Next up, the new web Test Hub!

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | Collaboration | Process Methodology | Productivity | SDLC | Team Foundation Server | TFS 2013 | TFS Service | Visual Studio 2013 | Work Item Tracking

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October 30th, 2013 Edition of the Chicago Visual Studio ALM User Group: More Visual Studio ALM 2013 Goodness

by Angela 16. October 2013 14:34

http://www.tfswhisperer.com/image.axd?picture=image_60.png

If you attended the September meeting, this is not *quite* a redux.  I’ll be talking about a variety of ALM features, some that I covered at the Downers Grove meeting last month.  BUT this time around I will also be joined by 2 of my smarty-pants colleagues from Polaris.  Landan Rotter will be talking about the new integrated deployment tool, InRelease, and will be doing a hands-on demo for your enjoyment.  Chris Taylor will also do a deep dive on data driven CodedUI testing as well as an awesome walk-through of setting up Lab Management to support automated test execution! 

Visual Studio ALM 2013 tools are going to release THIS FRIDAY, October 18th, ahem, THIS THURSDAY October 17th, and the big launch is November 13th. If you’re interested in participating in the virtual launch event on November 13th, be sure to check out the VS 2013 Launch Site and sign up soon!  And in the mean time, get ready for what coming by learning more about what's new and cool. And if you can’t wait until RTM, you can still get downloads of TFS and VS 2013 RC today.

Parking downtown is a bit costly, but Aon parking is pretty reasonable if you get there after 4:30pm and leave by 10pm. Check out www.SpotHero.com, they might just save you some serious cash.

 

Meeting Date:  Wednesday October 30th

Agenda:    6:30 - Dinner, 7:00 Presentation

Location: Microsoft-Chicago 200 E Randolph, 2nd Floor, Chicago

Registration:      http://chicagoalmug.org/

 

PLEASE NOTE: Security is strict at the Aon center.  You MUST register as building security will NOT allow individuals to access the building without being pre-registered.  Their rules, not mine.

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Say Hello to Chicago’s Newest ALM MVP

by Angela 3. October 2013 20:35

I’m totally stoked to be the latest Chicagoan to be named an ALM MVP. There are currently only 114 ALM MVPs worldwide (that I see on the site anyway), and I am proud to be counted amongst these awesome folks. Sadly, the site is not quite updated so you won’t see yours truly listed just yet.

Wait, “what the heck is an ALM MVP you say?” I know, that is a lot of acronyms there.  In case you’re not hip to Microsoft lingo, that’s an Application Lifecycle Management Most Valued Professional.  This essentially means that in the areas of ALM (TFS, Visual Studio, Microsoft Test Manager, SDLC, etc.), I’ve made significant enough contributions to the community at large to get some serious props. And it’s been a fun ride, and I certainly don’t plan to slow down :)

This is not to say I know EVERYTHING there is to know on the topic of ALM, oh how I wish there were enough hours in the day.  But on any given day you’re likely to find me Installing/upgrading/customizing TFS, scouring MSDN forums, leading a class through the ropes of agile development, or perhaps giving a talk at a local user group on adopting a new ALM strategy in the real world.  I’m definitely passionate about what I do.

Anyway, that’s it for now! Just a little update on the latest excitement in my professional life.  Hope to catch you at a conference or user group near you soon! And don’t forget to stop by the Chicago ALM User Group sometime.  We will be posting details on out October meeting soon!

 

And because I’m always striving to do thing my mom can brag about, here is a picture of me being all giddy about my award :)

V__7802

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | VS 2013 | VS 2012 | VS 2010 | Visual Studio 2013 | Visual Studio 2012 | Visual Studio | TFS Upgrade | TFS 2013 | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS 2010 | TFS 2008 | TFS | SDLC | Process Methodology | MSDN

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Receiving Random 403 Forbidden Errors on Your TFS SharePoint site? I Was.

by Angela 24. September 2013 16:57

So let’s start by explaining what was happening. I had just unraveled a mess of TFS/SharePoint/Reporting security that rivaled improperly-put-away-Christmas-lights levels of tangled.  All kinds of duplication, broken inheritance because of inexperienced admins adding individuals (instead of the AD groups I had setup) at every level of the SharePoint hierarchy, you name it!  So one day I get a head-scratcher of an issue from a business user who is customizing a TFS SharePoint portal for a project.

They were trying to edit the queries behind a couple of custom TFS web parts and were getting “403 Forbidden” errors at seemingly random times.  It would work on Monday but be broken on Tuesday and work again Wednesday.

image

I was not getting that error, but of course I am god of everything as the TFS admin, so there is little I cannot do.  But I also noticed not many other folks were experiencing the issue, well, to be precise not one other person was receiving the error.  In the same AD groups, in different AD groups, nada.  I verified all of the groups this person belonged to, checked and rechecked his AD group membership, made sure SharePoint still had all the correct security inheritance in place. Nothing was out of place. And every once in a while the user would be able to complete that same action again without the error. Seemingly, whenever I went in and performed the action he was being denied. What the WHAT?!? Now I was *really* intrigued. 

Needless to say, we did fix the issue, but not without some serious internet scouring. I was about to post to MSDN forums when i stumbled upon the issue.  This obscure Microsoft Support post fixed our problem.  So I should note for background purposes that this TFS instance began as a 2008 installation running against a super old version of WSS.  It has been upgraded twice, by me, and we are now happily running on TFS 2012.3 with WSS 3.0, and hopefully soon to be TFS 2013 and the latest release of SharePoint Server. The server had SURELY gone through the security updates described in the Support post.  But since no one used the TFS SharePoint sites until I came along and fixed all of the security, no one had encountered this super old issue until very recently. Luckily I was on-site when it did, because while frustrating, it was also fun to troubleshoot.  I am weird that way :)

Tags:

Application Lifecycle Management | ALM | TFS 2012 | TFS 2010 | TFS 2008 | TFS 2013 | Team Foundation Server | TFS | TFS Administration | TFS Upgrade

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Missing Some Important Icons (Admin, Help, Run Query) From Your TFS Service Web Tools?

by Angela 16. September 2013 16:00

So this was an interesting issue I ran into the other day, and all my Binging and Googling Kung-Fu produced nothing. I often run my TFS tools in multiple browsers. I mean, c’mon, I may prefer FireFox for some things, but Microsoft prefers if I use Internet Explorer when demoing to their customers ;) One day I launched into my TFS Service demo and noticed a few buttons had just vaporized off of the main web dashboard (the “agile” planning tools dashboard, not SharePoint.  Notice below how there are no buttons in the upper left-hand corner in IE, namely the Admin and Help icons:

image 

I can click where the icons SHOULD appear, and the buttons work, they just are invisible.  I thought I was crazy until a few coworkers were able to reproduce it on MY TFS Service instance, but not their own. As a former Microsoft employee I was a SUPER early adopter, so it was safe to assume we might be on different instances.

And then I verified it was fine in FireFox for that same instance:

image

WEIRD!!  I started spelunking around and noticed random icons were missing on other pages too:

image 

At this point I called in the heavy hitters, also known as the TFS Product Team, MVPs, and TFS Rangers for help.  And as usual they came to the rescue quickly. (Thanks Aaron Bjork!!)  So here was the solution in case anyone else runs into this strange issue.

There is a weird rendering bug in IE (9 and 10) with some instances of TFS Service. The way to get your buttons to re-appear is to tweak the Accelerated Graphics setting like so:

image 

Then once you restart the browser, everything should be back to normal again. Voila! :)

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Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS 2013 | TFS Service | VS 2013 | Internet Explorer | IE 10

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ALM Ruminations Part 2: TPS Reports and Writing Myself a New Pair of Fluevogs

by Angela 3. September 2013 17:58

Yes, Fluevogs. What? I don’t need a minivan!  My husband will find it amusing that I managed to get a plug in there for my favorite boots from the Fluevog fall lineup. It’s OK, I’ll stop talking about shoes now, read on...

If you’ve been following along with my ruminations about the process struggles and pop psychology required to survive software development, you may have already seen my first post. This is a follow-up, and I hope to have MANY more assuming I can find time between TFS installs Winking smile  So without further delay:

Favorite “Drive” quote #2: Goals that people [teams] set for themselves and that are devoted to attaining mastery are usually healthy. But goals imposed by others – sales targets, quarterly returns, standardized test scores, and so on – can sometimes have dangerous side effects.

So why do some managers cling to measuring their people by metrics like Lines of Code, # bugs fixed, and other archaic and easily gamed statistics? I can’t say for sure but I have some theories. One that I keep finding is that it’s often what they KNOW how to measure, and it makes them to feel like they have control over things. But sadly the accuracy of those metrics if often unreliable, at best. Add to that, their direct reports may have figured out how to work the system to meet artificially established goals, hiding issues, and masking discontent. Or perhaps software development management folks haven’t yet figured out what behavioral scientists have known for years - that creative work is actually HARMED by the use of extrinsic rewards systems.

Solving the first issue (bad metrics) is tough, how do you make someone see there is little value in many of the metrics that have traditionally been used since the beginning of IT? What SHOULD they be measuring instead? What are they themselves being measured on, and are those metrics effecting how they reward/punish the software team? I’m still working on perfecting how to address this one myself, and I often immediately point to the Dilbert where the software developer “codes himself a new minivan” as a wake-up call. Often times, it does not even occur to them that their cherished status reports might be at the root of the team’s problems.

The second point (hiding issues) is one I see even more often, where software teams themselves train managers that no matter how unreasonable a deadline, no matter how many times they change requirements, that the tem will double-down, work a lot of overtime and get it done. Even worse, most times the overtime goes unreported, and so any normal manager may conclude that any “small request” can be accommodated at the drop of a hat, and so will continue to do so. The team may be seen as a hero, but can also be seen as one that does not plan well, and is often scrambling to meet deadlines.  It is a double-edged sword. The team inevitably burns itself out trying to keep up, quality suffers in favor of getting features out the door quickly, and the manager often doesn’t get everything they wanted anyway. And no one is happy, not you, not the manager, and certainly not the customer. It’s lose-lose-lose situation and it doesn’t HAVE to be that way.

On the last point (squelching creativity), this is possibly the toughest of all to address, because again, most of us “IT folk” are not psychologists. Maybe your boss does not have an IT background, and simply does not understand that writing software is actually quite complex and difficult. You may have crafted hundreds of web pages, but that doesn’t mean that the 101st web page isn’t a totally different animal. God forbid the framework or tooling upon which you rely to build web pages has gone through a major upgrade recently!  I blame this on the inappropriate and overused comparison of software development to building a house. NO, NO, NO it is NOT just like building a house. And if you think the metaphor holds I doubt if you’ve ever actually written any software, or at least you haven’t in the last 10 years or so. Or maybe you want your software to turn out like just another plastic shoebox in a huge soulless fields of cheap Mc Mansions. Sure, in some cases the issue here is that IT management do not personally feel the pains or understand the challenges that the team is going through, or maybe they, in fact, are causing the pain… After all, the first step to recovery is realizing you have a problem in the first place…Seriously, we need an “agile intervention” offering complete with a 12-step program!

So if this sounds like where you work, buy your boss a copy of Drive and an anthology of Dilbert cartoons, and please stop training them to continue to give you unreasonable goals by working overtime and underreporting issues and bugs to make things look rosy. I promise you, that strategy may payoff in the short term, but in the long term nobody wins!

OK, I have a lot more spinning through my head but I think we’ve done enough navel gazing for this post. Stay tuned for more musings in the next week or so.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | General | Process Methodology | SDLC | Scrum | development

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Updating TFS 2012 RTM to TFS 2012.3, Always an Adventure

by Angela 8. August 2013 09:27

I often get asked to upgrade clients’ TFS instances to newer versions, apply updates, etc. and I swear it never “just works”.  Well, it did once, and it was a server I had literally JUST upgraded personally to TFS 2012 that no one had touched since Smile with tongue out  My challenges in upgrading TFS instances are rarely due to problems with TFS itself.  99% of the time someone got paranoid about an account having ‘sysadmin’ rights on TFS databases, or Administrator rights on one of the TFS servers, and removed it without telling anyone and suddenly boom!  Of course “boom” doesn’t happen until I am in there maintaining the server or performing an upgrade... So, onto my story about update 3.

It seems every time I get error messages back from the TFS install wizard, they’re not documented (don’t get me started on that rant!), no one else has blogged about it, and no one has asked about it in a forum that I can find.  So I’m posting it myself so the next person to run into this doesn’t waste a lot of time troubleshooting.

So, I was upgrading from TFS 2012.0 to TFS 2012.3.  I upgraded the server from TFS 2010 on SQL 2008 to TFS 2012 on SQL 2012 myself back in January of this year, with just a few minor hiccups. I returned to the client recently to do some customizations to discover they had undone some of the security setup I worked on. :: heavy sigh::  After granting my account all the necessary rights to effectively administer TFS I started working on the upgrade to TFS 2012.3.  About 20 minutes in I encountered this fun little error: “Error: TF400167: Installation failed for the package (patch_KB2815416) with the following status 0x80070643”

clip_image002

So to me there were two places to focus for figuring out the issue.  1) figure out what that KB file was and why it was failing to install, and 2) check out the status 0x80070643 and what causes it.

First I tried simply searching on the error message “TF400167 Installation failed for the package”.  A lot of unrelated posts were returned, and a few potentially helpful ones in Japanese.  Alas I do not speak or read that language.  I did see a lot of references to needing to reboot the server in the posts I COULD read, which I did, to no avail.

Then I tried finding any references to KB2815416 and found exactly one, but alas it was not related to the issue I was having. Grrr.

I dug through the error logs, found the one related to that file (KB2815416), and noticed a host of errors including one saying “TFS 2012 timeout while waiting for worker process” and lots of warnings in the TFS logs about issues with the TFS application pool - [Info   @22:09:26.796] Waiting for worker process for application pool Microsoft Team Foundation Server Message Queue Application Pool to stop.  OK then, Guess I’ll restart the app tier and try to install Update 3 again. Still not working. FRACK!

So now I started focusing on the status being thrown back (0x80070643) and I start finding more helpful posts, though most of them related to much older releases of TFS.  Still, gave it a go.  So I’d already rebooted the server, restarted IIS, but then I noted Vicky’s comment about necessary permissions of the user.  Well, I know the user I am logged in as SHOULD have all of those permissions, because it did back in January when I upgraded to TFS 2012, but we’ve been here before with other clients haven’t we?  BINGO! The TFS admin account I was using had its rights revoked on the SQL Server machine and databases. It was a general TFS Admin account that was shared too, not just Angela-consultant account, so that could have been a big problem for someone. Why, WHY does this happen everywhere I go?!?  So I added the TFS admin account back to the server admin group, and gave it sysadmin on the TFS databases, and finished up the upgrade nicely. Good thing I get paid by the hour, I guess.

The only other things I had to do was rebuild the data warehouse (through the admin console) and rebuild the cube to get reports back up and running.  And even though I manually ran the scheduled backup job after the upgrade successfully, when the exact same job ran overnight it failed with error: “TFS database backup job failed with error: TF30040: The database is not correctly configured. Contact your Team Foundation Server administrator.System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException (0x80131904): Could not find stored procedure 'prc_TfsSetTransactionLogMark'.”

Next step is to recreate the backup job and hope that does the trick.

Tags:

ALM | Application Lifecycle Management | TFS | TFS 2012 | TFS Administration | TFS Power Tools | TFS Upgrade | Team Foundation Server | Visual Studio | Visual Studio 2012

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Going to ThatConference? You SHOULD be!

by Angela 12. July 2013 12:36

This year is the second ThatConference and it is going to ROCK. Not only can you spend 3 days in the Wisconsin Dells hanging out with your peers learning about .NET, Java, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Ruby, PHP, agile, Azute, TypeScript, JavaScript, Node JS, Angular JS - has your head exploded yet? And that’s not all that’s being covered, I just got tired of typing in technologies. It’s quite mind-blowing. So pretty much anyone interested in tech will get a lot out of this conference.  Why pay thousands to go to a conference focusing on just one specific language, vendor, or platform? ThatConference is for the community, by the community. And we mean that.

Best part, it’s only $349 and that includes all sessions, keynotes, food, and a heck of a pig roast at the waterpark. You even get s discounted rate for the Kalahari both during the conference and the weekend before in case you want to make a vacation out of it.  I know I am!  Also, did I mention it is at an amazing water park?  With go-karts, laser tag, a climbing wall, a ferris wheel, need I say more? AND, as if that was not awesome enough, for a very small amount (just $39 total) you can even add your family to the fun.  We now have a kids’ track. The Family schedule can be found here: http://www.thatconference.com/Schedule/FamilySchedule 

Check out the session list here: http://www.thatconference.com/sessions. Note: MY session is Monday morning, so hope to see you there! Smile

Here are the specifics (you need to go to registration to see this, so maybe I can save you some clicks):

Attendee $349

The 2013 attendee ticket. Full access to over 125 sessions, keynotes, food and one epic water park. But be careful, water and electronics don’t play together. Ziploc bags not included.

Family Ticket $39

That Conference is a family friendly conference and this year we continue to improve on our family experience. This year we have a dedicated family schedule that includes 2 family sessions each day. Your family will have the opportunity to meet a few animals from the local zoo, to learning how to build some awesome robots with Lego. But that isn’t all! This year families will get their own badges, join us at our daily happy hour, beat another geek during game night and of course join us for a spectacular dinner at our signature pig roast and more. All that fun does come at a very small cost. For just 39.00 per family, you’re helping That Conference bring such epic fun to all.

GiveCamp & The Humanitarian Toolbox (Sat & Sun)  $0 – Heck yeah, it is FREE

On August 10th and 11th, That Conference will host the 2013 Midwest GiveCamp. This year, Midwest GiveCamp and That Conference will team up with the Humanitarian Toolbox in a quest to help build software in support of disaster relief. This is a free event and food will be provided.

Coderetreat ( Sun ) $0 – Heck yeah, it is FREE

On ** Sunday August 11th from 11AM - 7PM** That Conference will host a free Coderetreat. Coderetreat is a day-long, intensive practice event, focusing on the fundamentals of software development and design. By providing developers the opportunity to take part in focused practice, away from the pressures of 'getting things done', the coderetreat format has proven itself to be a highly effective means of skill improvement. Practicing the basic principles of modular and object-oriented design, developers can improve their ability to write code that minimizes the cost of change over time. More information found here: http://coderetreat.org/

Tags:

.NET 4.5 | ALM | ASP.NET | Agile | Application Lifecycle Management | Azure | Cloud Computing | HTML5 | MSDN | Mobile development | SDLC | TFS 2012 | Team Foundation Server | U/X | User Experience | Visual Studio | Windows 8 | iOS | JavaScript

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